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I have a story to share, its somewhat related. My good friend just moved in to a new house and decided to install his modem in his basement, he has Rogers Ignite he has a wiring closet with all the ethernet cables going to, he is planning to use one network jack on the main floor and one network jack on the second floor as a spot to install his wifi pod, and use the ethernet for backhaul to the modem. it will be a nice and clean installation his wifi will have full strength all over his house with the pods but before the pods the modem signal was strong in basement only and weak on main floor.

I know not everyone's home is wired for ethernet so unless you have the house pre-wired or you can easily run an ethernet from floor to floor then go for it, it will greatly improve your connection reliability.
 

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By reliability I meant reliability of the mesh network itself, not the wifi connection to devices. I have seen mesh network failures due to lost wifi connectivity between the main mesh node and wireless nodes. It wasn't a signal strength issue, just a quirk of the devices being used. It happened with a couple of different models of mesh hardware. The units have since been replaced with newer models and it's no longer an issue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Either way DigitalCyclist, I hope your question was answered. I know that sometimes we as a community can get very detailed and technical in our answer or explanation and this could lead to asking more questions about the problem or causing confusion to some people who do not know what all these terms mean. We hope you will find what ever solution weather it be buying the pods from plume directly or obtaining them from your ISP to be helpful which ever route you go.

Also don't be afraid to ask us technical questions as we are a very knowledgeable community often more knowledgeable than internet providers customer service personnel
Thank you. Not to worry. I've spent an awful lot of years buried in technical and hands-on stuff of all kinds. I've just lost my ability to continue doing that.😞
Detailed or technical responses are preferred over off-topic fluff any day (at least for me).
Cheers!
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
I have a story to share, its somewhat related. My good friend just moved in to a new house and decided to install his modem in his basement, he has Rogers Ignite he has a wiring closet with all the ethernet cables going to, he is planning to use one network jack on the main floor and one network jack on the second floor as a spot to install his wifi pod, and use the ethernet for backhaul to the modem. it will be a nice and clean installation his wifi will have full strength all over his house with the pods but before the pods the modem signal was strong in basement only and weak on main floor.

I know not everyone's home is wired for ethernet so unless you have the house pre-wired or you can easily run an ethernet from floor to floor then go for it, it will greatly improve your connection reliability.
That's pretty much my situation. I have a place in a crawlspace, tightly bounded by basement walls and the concrete base of the fireplace and chimney, where the Cogeco demarc and services terminate, with a wiring panel from which I ran ethernet to a few selected locations in the house during renovations. So my modem/router is pretty much useless as a Wi-Fi access point. I currently have another router on the main floor acting as a wireless access point, and it works quite well. My main goal now though is to simplify my LAN and Internet configuration as much as possible so that as my health fades to zero my wife will be able to make a phone call and say, "it's all your stuff, Cogeco. Come and fix it."
 

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I have a similar situation as well. The modem is in the basement behind some large duct work, underneath a bunch of house wiring and on the wrong side of the house for the main floor. To compound that, some of the walls contain metal which blocks wifi, the house next door has about 6 access points that operate on every usable frequency and their main router must be right next to the outside wall next to our living room and kitchen. I suspect they have a tri-band mesh node in every room. Their wifi signal was stronger in some of our rooms and most of the backyard. Needless to say, it took some experimentation and some very good wired mesh routers to overcome that. I turned of the main router wifi and installed two centrally located wired mesh nodes where ethernet is available and one wireless node where wiring would be difficult. I looked at preconfigured mesh systems but they were either poorly made or too expensive and I already had a mesh capable router. At the time, mesh nodes were not available from the ISP.
 

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My experience is with Bell (according to an earlier post their pods are from the same manufacturer). The installer didn't know anything other than what (I assume) his training manual provided. He insisted on placing a pod right next to our upstairs TV, claiming that it would solve any potential issues. My understanding of the technology is that placing a pod right next to the TV would not be the correct solution (sure, you get a great signal from the pod, but it's no closer to the router -- or another pod -- so you don't solve anything). After the installer left I measured my wifi speed in the upstairs bedroom (the router is in the basement). It was pretty uninspiring. I unplugged all the pods and my wifi speed tripled! I then strategically placed just two pods (by "strategically" I mean trying to place it at the mid-point between router and device, or between another pod and device) and my wifi speed went up a little more. We have a small home (2100 sq ft) so 4 pods was overkill.
 

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Yes, the correct way to place the pods is about half way between the nearest pod or mesh router and any dead zones. In any event, all the pods must receive a good signal from the nearest mesh connected pod. If there are multiple floors, place a pod on each floor above or below the main wired pod or mesh router. Then proceed to place extra pods about half way to any dead or weak zones. Then make sure all the pods have a good signal back to the nearest wired pod or router, if possible, or the closest daisy chained pod.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
For your information, for anyone following this thread: just got off the line with a Cogeco rep who confirmed that the Hitron CODA modem/router will NOT interoperate in a seamless Wi-Fi mesh network with the Plume Wi-Fi pods. The Hitron Wi-Fi SSID and service can be left active, but will be independent of the Plume mesh network provided by the Wi-Fi pods under a different SSID. Hence the recommendation to turn off wireless on the Hitron and just use the pods for wireless.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
ok then i would not use pods in that case, maybe see if they will upgrade your modem to a newer one then see if the pods will work seamlessly
This might be a good for strategy for anyone willing to wait for such upgrades to become available. I'd wager this will be a challenge when combining equipment from different manufacturers for quite some time. I haven't seen any of the manufacturers to date tout that they conform to the Wi-Fi Certified EasyMesh standard (Wi-Fi EasyMesh | Wi-Fi Alliance ).
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
To close out my interest in this thread, I'll share that a couple of weeks ago I upgraded my Cogeco Internet service and replaced their cable modem and my Asus routers with a Cogeco-supplied Arris TG3452 modem/router. I was also able to extend the incoming coax to a place in the house for better Wi-Fi coverage.

Installation and configuration of the router was quite straightforward, although its administrative interface is a bit unpredictable and cumbersome.

To date, I've had no problems and Wi-Fi coverage of the entire area I need seems rock solid. With a wired connection to the router, Speedtest is consistently reporting 20-23 ms latency, 945 Mbps down and 30 Mbps up (which will improve as Cogeco rolls out upload upgrades). Wireless performance varies with location of course, but I'm quite happy. I now have a much simplified network and don't need to worry about Wi-Fi pods,
 
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