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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Due to declining health, I am unable to look after our home network as I have in the past. To get around that I'm looking at upgrading my Cogeco service and using their modem/router and Wi-Fi pods, installed by them. Does anyone have experience with Cogeco's Wi-Fi pods? As near as I can tell, they are Plume pods – presumably Superpods and not the original Plume Pods?

Do the Wi-Fi Pods create a seamless mesh network only among themselves, or with the provided base Cogeco wireless modem/router as well? For example, with 2 Wi-Fi pods, would I have a seamless mesh Wi-Fi network with 3 access points or just 2? The answer would dictate how many Pods I would need and also where I would place them.

Final question, if anyone knows – while I know that these Pods can be wired back to the router, presumably like other Wi-Fi mesh setups, they don't need to be. Correct?

Thanks for any help anyone can provide.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
We've had ours installed about 4 months ago. They are the SuperPods (2 ethernet ports) and they work in connection with the Modem/Router since it is still connected for DOCSIS (of course), DNS and DHCP control. The Wi-Fi on your modem SHOULD turn off when you get the pods up and running. I posted that in caps since ours didn't quite do that, we had a different Wi-Fi SSID from the Arris plus the new ones I created on the pods. I contacted Cogeco and they said the pods being connected should have run a script on the Arris to turn off Wi-Fi. That was quickly fixed.

Only your pods would be access points, but only one of your pods has to be physically connected to the modem via ethernet for them to work. The 2nd and any other pods will connect wirelessly.

As for the mesh portion, I'm not sure if it is truly considered "mesh" since I don't really need that much coverage and I only got these pods since they were recommended when we switched to Epico. I'm not sure of all the requirements of what makes it a mesh network.

I hope I could at least answer a few questions.

:)
thank you! That answers all the key questions. If you can roam around and see your wireless connection seamlessly carried from one pod to another, i.e. there is one SSID and connection doesn't drop during the switch, then it is indeed a "mesh network". Thanks again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I dunno man about the modems wifi being turned off and only using the pod for wifi, i dont think thats right or suppose to happen.

Just a FYI, when you have pods installed your modems SSID should still broadcast and be able to connect to, pods are not designed to turn off the modems wifi and move it somewhere else, but more or so to "complement" and extend the coverage area. so if your modems in the basement and you use a pod on the main floor, you will have blanket wifi coverage in basement AND main floor.

if your modem wifi is turning off when the pods are connected you should have this fixed.
I can understand this happening.... Devices from different manufacturers often don't work together well. Mixing Plume Superpods and an Arris router together is something I would not expect to work in a cooperative mesh. Turning off the Wi-Fi function on the Arris router and leaving the Superpods to provide the mesh network means good coverage without the interruption of being switched between devices. That was one of the reasons for my original questions – knowing this, I know I need an additional Superpod (3 versus 2) in order to get the coverage I need.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
It has already been established that these are the same as Plume SuperPods and that they don't work with the wifi from the Cogeco router. While there may be slight difference in firmware it does not appear that the Cogeco versions are functionally different.

It was mentioned that the Plume SuperPods supplied by Bell work with the Bell Home Hub 3000 router but that may due to the design of the router instead of any modification of the pods. Correctly designed mesh products, as in adhering to the IEEE 802.11 amendment for mesh networking, should work well together. I suspect that the Bell Home Hub 3000 router supports mesh but the Cogeco Arris router does not, which would explain why the wifi in the Arris router is disabled by Cogeco.
Without knowing more about Cogeco's Arris or Hitron modem/routers, my working assumption is that they won't work in a cooperative mash with the pods. That's okay – one extra pod isn't going to break the bank, and if wireless is turned off in the main modem/router, that eliminates one component in future troubleshooting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
From their website:

Cogeco Wi-Fi Pods work seamlessly with your Cogeco modem to deliver a better Internet experience for every family member.
The pods remove dead spots and, together with the modem, create an intelligent system that’s always learning from your Internet behaviours—so everyone has a strong connection.
Our pods come with the Cogeco Wi-Fi app, which gives you total control of your wireless home network.


I suggest if you are a cogeco customer, please call them and troubleshoot. Mesh means the modem, pod 1 and pod 2 form a mesh network together, if this is not happening, you need to phone their technical support, having the modems wifi shut off and only the pods wifi working is not a complete mesh network and while filling a dead spot in a different part of your house, it will CREATE a new dead spot where your modem is, and this should not happen.

Regardless, their website specifically tells you how it work, if its not working as per advertised, it should not be the responsibility of the customer to suffer with problems, they clearly state what they offer, if you do not receive this, CALL them and have them make it work.
I will follow-up with their tech support for sure before committing to anything. If I find anything useful, I'll post back here in the thread.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
For those interested, here's a link to a Plume support article on using wired backhaul in addition to wireless backhaul for their Superpods. Note that using ethernet wired backhaul is independent of any modem and/or router function. In fact, wired backhaul can be daisy chained pod to pod.
Plume Wired Backhaul
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Either way DigitalCyclist, I hope your question was answered. I know that sometimes we as a community can get very detailed and technical in our answer or explanation and this could lead to asking more questions about the problem or causing confusion to some people who do not know what all these terms mean. We hope you will find what ever solution weather it be buying the pods from plume directly or obtaining them from your ISP to be helpful which ever route you go.

Also don't be afraid to ask us technical questions as we are a very knowledgeable community often more knowledgeable than internet providers customer service personnel
Thank you. Not to worry. I've spent an awful lot of years buried in technical and hands-on stuff of all kinds. I've just lost my ability to continue doing that.😞
Detailed or technical responses are preferred over off-topic fluff any day (at least for me).
Cheers!
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
I have a story to share, its somewhat related. My good friend just moved in to a new house and decided to install his modem in his basement, he has Rogers Ignite he has a wiring closet with all the ethernet cables going to, he is planning to use one network jack on the main floor and one network jack on the second floor as a spot to install his wifi pod, and use the ethernet for backhaul to the modem. it will be a nice and clean installation his wifi will have full strength all over his house with the pods but before the pods the modem signal was strong in basement only and weak on main floor.

I know not everyone's home is wired for ethernet so unless you have the house pre-wired or you can easily run an ethernet from floor to floor then go for it, it will greatly improve your connection reliability.
That's pretty much my situation. I have a place in a crawlspace, tightly bounded by basement walls and the concrete base of the fireplace and chimney, where the Cogeco demarc and services terminate, with a wiring panel from which I ran ethernet to a few selected locations in the house during renovations. So my modem/router is pretty much useless as a Wi-Fi access point. I currently have another router on the main floor acting as a wireless access point, and it works quite well. My main goal now though is to simplify my LAN and Internet configuration as much as possible so that as my health fades to zero my wife will be able to make a phone call and say, "it's all your stuff, Cogeco. Come and fix it."
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
For your information, for anyone following this thread: just got off the line with a Cogeco rep who confirmed that the Hitron CODA modem/router will NOT interoperate in a seamless Wi-Fi mesh network with the Plume Wi-Fi pods. The Hitron Wi-Fi SSID and service can be left active, but will be independent of the Plume mesh network provided by the Wi-Fi pods under a different SSID. Hence the recommendation to turn off wireless on the Hitron and just use the pods for wireless.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
ok then i would not use pods in that case, maybe see if they will upgrade your modem to a newer one then see if the pods will work seamlessly
This might be a good for strategy for anyone willing to wait for such upgrades to become available. I'd wager this will be a challenge when combining equipment from different manufacturers for quite some time. I haven't seen any of the manufacturers to date tout that they conform to the Wi-Fi Certified EasyMesh standard (Wi-Fi EasyMesh | Wi-Fi Alliance ).
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
To close out my interest in this thread, I'll share that a couple of weeks ago I upgraded my Cogeco Internet service and replaced their cable modem and my Asus routers with a Cogeco-supplied Arris TG3452 modem/router. I was also able to extend the incoming coax to a place in the house for better Wi-Fi coverage.

Installation and configuration of the router was quite straightforward, although its administrative interface is a bit unpredictable and cumbersome.

To date, I've had no problems and Wi-Fi coverage of the entire area I need seems rock solid. With a wired connection to the router, Speedtest is consistently reporting 20-23 ms latency, 945 Mbps down and 30 Mbps up (which will improve as Cogeco rolls out upload upgrades). Wireless performance varies with location of course, but I'm quite happy. I now have a much simplified network and don't need to worry about Wi-Fi pods,
 
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