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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Due to declining health, I am unable to look after our home network as I have in the past. To get around that I'm looking at upgrading my Cogeco service and using their modem/router and Wi-Fi pods, installed by them. Does anyone have experience with Cogeco's Wi-Fi pods? As near as I can tell, they are Plume pods – presumably Superpods and not the original Plume Pods?

Do the Wi-Fi Pods create a seamless mesh network only among themselves, or with the provided base Cogeco wireless modem/router as well? For example, with 2 Wi-Fi pods, would I have a seamless mesh Wi-Fi network with 3 access points or just 2? The answer would dictate how many Pods I would need and also where I would place them.

Final question, if anyone knows – while I know that these Pods can be wired back to the router, presumably like other Wi-Fi mesh setups, they don't need to be. Correct?

Thanks for any help anyone can provide.
 

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Plume seems to be the manufacturer of the pods that is being sold by Bell, Rogers, Cogeco, etc. If its anything like the ones Rogers and Bell customers are using then yes they routinely optimize their connection. I started working with commercial mesh technology over 12+ years ago and am happy to see it being available in a consumer product like the pods.
 

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We've had ours installed about 4 months ago. They are the SuperPods (2 ethernet ports) and they work in connection with the Modem/Router since it is still connected for DOCSIS (of course), DNS and DHCP control. The Wi-Fi on your modem SHOULD turn off when you get the pods up and running. I posted that in caps since ours didn't quite do that, we had a different Wi-Fi SSID from the Arris plus the new ones I created on the pods. I contacted Cogeco and they said the pods being connected should have run a script on the Arris to turn off Wi-Fi. That was quickly fixed.

Only your pods would be access points, but only one of your pods has to be physically connected to the modem via ethernet for them to work. The 2nd and any other pods will connect wirelessly.

As for the mesh portion, I'm not sure if it is truly considered "mesh" since I don't really need that much coverage and I only got these pods since they were recommended when we switched to Epico. I'm not sure of all the requirements of what makes it a mesh network.

I hope I could at least answer a few questions.

:)
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
We've had ours installed about 4 months ago. They are the SuperPods (2 ethernet ports) and they work in connection with the Modem/Router since it is still connected for DOCSIS (of course), DNS and DHCP control. The Wi-Fi on your modem SHOULD turn off when you get the pods up and running. I posted that in caps since ours didn't quite do that, we had a different Wi-Fi SSID from the Arris plus the new ones I created on the pods. I contacted Cogeco and they said the pods being connected should have run a script on the Arris to turn off Wi-Fi. That was quickly fixed.

Only your pods would be access points, but only one of your pods has to be physically connected to the modem via ethernet for them to work. The 2nd and any other pods will connect wirelessly.

As for the mesh portion, I'm not sure if it is truly considered "mesh" since I don't really need that much coverage and I only got these pods since they were recommended when we switched to Epico. I'm not sure of all the requirements of what makes it a mesh network.

I hope I could at least answer a few questions.

:)
thank you! That answers all the key questions. If you can roam around and see your wireless connection seamlessly carried from one pod to another, i.e. there is one SSID and connection doesn't drop during the switch, then it is indeed a "mesh network". Thanks again.
 

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Yes, it stays connected as we move around and has one SSID and it uses band steering since the 2.4 and 5Ghz networks aren't seperate names. The pods handle this 100x better than our Arris did.
 
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I dunno man about the modems wifi being turned off and only using the pod for wifi, i dont think thats right or suppose to happen.

Just a FYI, when you have pods installed your modems SSID should still broadcast and be able to connect to, pods are not designed to turn off the modems wifi and move it somewhere else, but more or so to "complement" and extend the coverage area. so if your modems in the basement and you use a pod on the main floor, you will have blanket wifi coverage in basement AND main floor.

if your modem wifi is turning off when the pods are connected you should have this fixed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I dunno man about the modems wifi being turned off and only using the pod for wifi, i dont think thats right or suppose to happen.

Just a FYI, when you have pods installed your modems SSID should still broadcast and be able to connect to, pods are not designed to turn off the modems wifi and move it somewhere else, but more or so to "complement" and extend the coverage area. so if your modems in the basement and you use a pod on the main floor, you will have blanket wifi coverage in basement AND main floor.

if your modem wifi is turning off when the pods are connected you should have this fixed.
I can understand this happening.... Devices from different manufacturers often don't work together well. Mixing Plume Superpods and an Arris router together is something I would not expect to work in a cooperative mesh. Turning off the Wi-Fi function on the Arris router and leaving the Superpods to provide the mesh network means good coverage without the interruption of being switched between devices. That was one of the reasons for my original questions – knowing this, I know I need an additional Superpod (3 versus 2) in order to get the coverage I need.
 

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Not familiar with coments given regarding the modem. We have the Bell System....modem is Bell 3000 and am using four pods in our apartment. It is completly wi-fi with no ethernet conection to the modem. It works very well for phones and streaming Netflex and Prime.
 

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I can understand this happening.... Devices from different manufacturers often don't work together well. Mixing Plume Superpods and an Arris router together is something I would not expect to work in a cooperative mesh. Turning off the Wi-Fi function on the Arris router and leaving the Superpods to provide the mesh network means good coverage without the interruption of being switched between devices. That was one of the reasons for my original questions – knowing this, I know I need an additional Superpod (3 versus 2) in order to get the coverage I need.
I understand that concern. It was my understanding that if you obtained the pods from your internet service provider then your modem already has a built in software or firmware designed to communicate with them directly hence my earlier comment about the modems ssid not needing to be turned off.

They work together and constantly optimize your signal.
 

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The Plume SuperPods are not designed to work with a service provider modem's wifi router. It's best if the nodes are wired using ethernet but since they are tri-band, one of the 5GHz bands can be used as a backhaul in order to improve performance, as is done with most tri-band mesh systems. When relying on wifi as the backhaul, the wifi connected nodes must have a strong signal and a good connection. Unless it is wired, placing a node in a dead spot won't work well. Wifi connected mesh nodes are ideally placed where they get a good signal with the main, ethernet connected node and also provide a good signal to devices in a dead zone. Alternately, they could use another wifi connected mesh node (daisy chaining) but that can reduce wifi speeds.

There is lots of info about these pods on the Plume website.
 

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The op specifically inquired about COGECO's Wi-Fi pods, not the Plume super pods, which is a very similar product but not sold thru the internet providers. Cogeco just like Bell, Rogers, and I presume Telus, offers the Wi-Fi pods as a Wi-Fi coverage solution. They can have Ethernet as a backhaul or use one of the Wi-Fi radios yes. Because the OP was specifically asking about COGECO's Wi-Fi Pods, as specified in the Title of the thread and in the introduction post, this is the one that is designed to work with the service providers modem. A friend of mine has them and the coverage they provide is Amazing., seamless handoff, etc.
 

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It has already been established that these are the same as Plume SuperPods and that they don't work with the wifi from the Cogeco router. While there may be slight difference in firmware it does not appear that the Cogeco versions are functionally different.

It was mentioned that the Plume SuperPods supplied by Bell work with the Bell Home Hub 3000 router but that may due to the design of the router instead of any modification of the pods. Correctly designed mesh products, as in adhering to the IEEE 802.11 amendment for mesh networking, should work well together. I suspect that the Bell Home Hub 3000 router supports mesh but the Cogeco Arris router does not, which would explain why the wifi in the Arris router is disabled by Cogeco.
 

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From their website:

Cogeco Wi-Fi Pods work seamlessly with your Cogeco modem to deliver a better Internet experience for every family member.
The pods remove dead spots and, together with the modem, create an intelligent system that’s always learning from your Internet behaviours—so everyone has a strong connection.
Our pods come with the Cogeco Wi-Fi app, which gives you total control of your wireless home network.


I suggest if you are a cogeco customer, please call them and troubleshoot. Mesh means the modem, pod 1 and pod 2 form a mesh network together, if this is not happening, you need to phone their technical support, having the modems wifi shut off and only the pods wifi working is not a complete mesh network and while filling a dead spot in a different part of your house, it will CREATE a new dead spot where your modem is, and this should not happen.

Regardless, their website specifically tells you how it work, if its not working as per advertised, it should not be the responsibility of the customer to suffer with problems, they clearly state what they offer, if you do not receive this, CALL them and have them make it work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
It has already been established that these are the same as Plume SuperPods and that they don't work with the wifi from the Cogeco router. While there may be slight difference in firmware it does not appear that the Cogeco versions are functionally different.

It was mentioned that the Plume SuperPods supplied by Bell work with the Bell Home Hub 3000 router but that may due to the design of the router instead of any modification of the pods. Correctly designed mesh products, as in adhering to the IEEE 802.11 amendment for mesh networking, should work well together. I suspect that the Bell Home Hub 3000 router supports mesh but the Cogeco Arris router does not, which would explain why the wifi in the Arris router is disabled by Cogeco.
Without knowing more about Cogeco's Arris or Hitron modem/routers, my working assumption is that they won't work in a cooperative mash with the pods. That's okay – one extra pod isn't going to break the bank, and if wireless is turned off in the main modem/router, that eliminates one component in future troubleshooting.
 

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the idea of the wifi enabled in the modem is to give the pods a backhaul link, if its off, then the pods need some other way of transmitting the backhaul to the modem such as ethernet run, or powerline, but it could also be enabled but hidden, we do not know this, a lot of us also live outside of cogeco territory so we can not easily check
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
From their website:

Cogeco Wi-Fi Pods work seamlessly with your Cogeco modem to deliver a better Internet experience for every family member.
The pods remove dead spots and, together with the modem, create an intelligent system that’s always learning from your Internet behaviours—so everyone has a strong connection.
Our pods come with the Cogeco Wi-Fi app, which gives you total control of your wireless home network.


I suggest if you are a cogeco customer, please call them and troubleshoot. Mesh means the modem, pod 1 and pod 2 form a mesh network together, if this is not happening, you need to phone their technical support, having the modems wifi shut off and only the pods wifi working is not a complete mesh network and while filling a dead spot in a different part of your house, it will CREATE a new dead spot where your modem is, and this should not happen.

Regardless, their website specifically tells you how it work, if its not working as per advertised, it should not be the responsibility of the customer to suffer with problems, they clearly state what they offer, if you do not receive this, CALL them and have them make it work.
I will follow-up with their tech support for sure before committing to anything. If I find anything useful, I'll post back here in the thread.
 

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they said the pods being connected should have run a script on the Arris to turn off Wi-Fi.
I took it from this that the Arris modem did not work with the pods. The other possibility that I had not considered is that the wifi on the Arris router is not turned off but merely hidden to be used as the mesh backhaul. That could be determined with a wifi analyzer.

From their website:
Cogeco Wi-Fi Pods work seamlessly with your Cogeco modem to deliver a better Internet experience for every family member.
I take anything an internet provider says on their website with a grain of salt. That copy sounds like it was written by the marketing team. I doubt that many Cogeco employees know how their modems and pods work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
For those interested, here's a link to a Plume support article on using wired backhaul in addition to wireless backhaul for their Superpods. Note that using ethernet wired backhaul is independent of any modem and/or router function. In fact, wired backhaul can be daisy chained pod to pod.
Plume Wired Backhaul
 

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Either way DigitalCyclist, I hope your question was answered. I know that sometimes we as a community can get very detailed and technical in our answer or explanation and this could lead to asking more questions about the problem or causing confusion to some people who do not know what all these terms mean. We hope you will find what ever solution weather it be buying the pods from plume directly or obtaining them from your ISP to be helpful which ever route you go.

Also don't be afraid to ask us technical questions as we are a very knowledgeable community often more knowledgeable than internet providers customer service personnel
 

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here's a link to a Plume support article on using wired backhaul
I've found that wired backhaul is more reliable and results in faster wifi speeds, both to devices connected a mesh node and total throughput. In addition, if all mesh nodes are wired then it may be possible to use the wifi backhaul channel as an extra wifi channel for wireless devices, which can further increase overall wifi speeds.
 
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