Canadian TV, Computing and Home Theatre Forums banner

1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
229 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I just got a PS3 a couple of weeks ago and currently use it with a Samsung A650 46" LCD.

I'm researching various models of LED, LCD and Plasma in the 46 - 50" range to put the PS3 on in our family room.

I'd have no problem getting another Samsung LCD, however I would like to keep the budget around 1K CDN and get the biggest panel for the money.

I've seen various brands of 50" Plasmas for $700-900 but all are 720p. People tell me you won't notice any difference visually (most people anyways) between 720p and 1080p.

But if I just get a 720p, would I just buying something that could become obsolete fast? Aren't most blu-rays in 1080p? What about hooking a computer up to a 720p via HDMI, would you notice any difference if It can't do 1080p?

Thanks for any advice. I've done lots of reading on various forums but people of course are on both sides of the fence making it more difficult to choose.
 

·
Member #1
Joined
·
47,683 Posts
This has been discussed many times in the past, especially a couple of years ago when 1080p panels first arrived.

The short answer is that unless your watching Blu-ray from 4 feet away, you will likely never notice the difference. (this coming from a guy who watched a 720p and 1080p Panasonic Plasma side by side (same size) with the same 1080p source material playing on both displays)

I recommend searching the old threads for more commentary.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
56,526 Posts
What hugh said, however, if you're going to hook up a computer, get 1080P since 720P is not great with computers. 1080P TVs also tend to have more/better other features, not just resolution. Resolution is way down the list of things you should be looking at, unless you're going to use it with a computer. Previous older, but relevant thread:

http://www.digitalhome.ca/forum/showthread.php?t=36791 1080P?

BTW, most of today's TVs are 768P.

http://www.digitalhome.ca/forum/showthread.php?t=73528 Native formats

http://www.digitalhome.ca/forum/showthread.php?t=87543 Upconversion
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
Good advice by Hugh.

I've got 42" LG and I can't tell the difference between 1080i and 720p, or connected between component or HDMI, it take so long for the signal to switch that you cant remember which was best anyway. Side by side I imagine there would be a slight difference.
I have an old and DVD and the 420p give an excellent pictu
The 1080 p will only come on with Blue Ray, so if most of your viewing is transmitted programs 720p is fine and cheaper.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
229 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks guys.

Well I found this article http://www.thebestplasmatv.com/guides/720p-vs-1080p/

So if you do sit close enough you can see the difference. Since the PS3 has a blu-ray player I will be watching the occasional movie on it. And using my computer via HDMI to the tv.

So I guess I should get a 1080P then. I do use the computer a lot so I don't mind paying an extra $200 or so for a 1080p panel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,131 Posts
I wouldn't get anything less than 1080p for a PS3. As already mentioned, computer graphics need a 1:1 mapping to avoid distracting artifacts and 720p is going to be too small for a 46" or 50" display. Blu-ray will look a lot better as well. With some sources, such as Bell TV there will be no difference. I don't see any difference with Bell TV but it is noticeable with Blu-ray.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
229 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I have my eye on the Panasonic 50" U2-Series 1080p HD Plasma TV (TCP50U2).

Typically found for just under $1000. Any others I should consider in that price range and size of 50"? I hear the Samsung plasmas have problems with a noisy power supply?

Is the Samsung 50" Series 5 1080p Plasma HDTV (PN50C540) one of these people complain about?
 

·
Member #1
Joined
·
47,683 Posts
I was talking to friend the other day who is looking for a 50" plasma for $1,000. The one that we decided on for him was the Panny. Nice panel.

I do use the computer a lot so I don't mind paying an extra $200 or so for a 1080p panel.
Because LCD's are typically brighter, many folks prefer them when using them with a computer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
235 Posts
I wouldn't get anything less than 1080p for a PS3. As already mentioned, computer graphics need a 1:1 mapping to avoid distracting artifacts and 720p is going to be too small for a 46" or 50" display. Blu-ray will look a lot better as well. With some sources, such as Bell TV there will be no difference. I don't see any difference with Bell TV but it is noticeable with Blu-ray.
__________________
-- Scary
Depends on the games you're playing, watch what the games are formated for. Many are simply formated for 720p and actually look worse when run at 1080p. I believe more of the PS3 games are formated at 1080p but many of the xbox 360 games are done at 720p. So cross platform games may only be done for 720p.

Not sure i would spend a pile on a new tv until the new cable format finally comes out. Havn't kept up with it in a while but it might be something to research as well. If HDMI is being replaced i'd wait, or go cheaper in the interm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,352 Posts
I've got 42" LG and I can't tell the difference between 1080i and 720p
On my 42" Sharp, shows that come from 720p networks seem to be a bit softer than those from 1080p. However, depending on size, distance and set quality, you may or may not see a difference. On the other hand, I bought a 23" 1080p monitor, because it'd be primarily used with my computer and viewed from an appropriately close distance. I move my chair further back, when watching TV on that monitor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,352 Posts
^^^^
Sorry, typo. I meant 1080i. However, my computer does display in 1080p, as does my Blu-ray player.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
229 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
I think I've narrowed it down to the Samsung LN46C610/650 or the Sony KDL-46EX500. Both are very similar except the Samsung has an ethernet jack. What is this for? Streaming video?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,006 Posts
Even for movie production 720p is all you need. The Olympus PEN used in this movie only supports 720p60 (actually 30p doubled in software).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fnZjvFbm42w

First the PEN shot a broadcast TV commercial in HD, and now the PEN has gone Hollywood! Go "Behind the Lens" with Academy Award-winning Director of Photography Dean Semler to see how he used the Olympus PEN in the critically acclaimed Disney Motion Picture "Secretariat" in theaters now. View some of the amazing horse racing shots captured with the Olympus PEN E-P1 in the official Secretariat trailer here: http://youtu.be/UKmuvjL2cVw?hd=1
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
What hugh said, however, if you're going to hook up a computer, get 1080P since 720P is not great with computers. 1080P TVs also tend to have more/better other features, not just resolution. Resolution is way down the list of things you should be looking at, unless you're going to use it with a computer. Previous older, but relevant thread:
I don't know where you get this idea from that 720p is no good for use with RGB-PC?
I'm connected to my computer with just a splitter and the picture is crystal clear, in fact superb.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
56,526 Posts
It may be clear, however it has roughly half the resolution of a 1080P display if 1080P can be fed by the computer (HDMI) - quite a difference, especially on a large display, or if sitting close. I never mentioned RGB. (1080P is 1080 x 1920, 720P is usually 768 x 1365 pixels) As mentioned earlier, most 1080P TVs also have a zero overscan option (pixel for pixel) on HDMI inputs, which can be important.

Here's a chart which shows when you'll be able to see the difference. (Most people sit pretty close to a computer display)

http://www.soundandvisionmag.com/features/2006/02/maxing-out-resolution
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,352 Posts
I don't know where you get this idea from that 720p is no good for use with RGB-PC?
While you can certainly get a good image on 720p, you generally have more detail and are closer to the display when using a computer. These factors make higher resolution more important for computers than TV. With some applications, such as CAD, higher resolution is critical.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
229 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Yes I'd be feeding the TV via HDMI. I have a Radeon XFX HD5770 video card.

I game both on the PC and PS3 so I'd want the best resolution. But I'd also be doing regular computer stuff and don't want to risk burn in from a brower or any program that displays the same sort of image.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
Well all I can say is that I get an excellent picture with 720p and it's a fantastic image for watching movies too.
The extra price premium to go to 1080p is certainly not justified for a 42" television imho.
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
Top