Canadian TV, Computing and Home Theatre Forums banner

41 - 49 of 49 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
56,431 Posts
I know it's a bit of old news, but when watching a recent edition of "Motoring TV", there was almost no part of the programme that was not a product placement, or an informercial.

There was a segment on a Michelin winter tire that was basically an infomercial for Michelin and Tirecraft. It's possible to do a segment that's not quite as in your face promotion.

Of course there were the usual product placements for WeatherTech and Silver Wax (in every trunk, etc). There were the segments on Stark and Silver Wax. There was a segment on the Formula E in Brooklyn, but it ended up as a Nissan commercial...

I know when they review or introduce a vehicle, it's a bit of a "commercial" for that brand/model, but it's a lot different when the promotion becomes the main part of the segment instead of a review or introduction.

I'm now able to scan this show in about 10 minutes. It wasn't always like this.

https://motoringtv.com/ (I don't think this latest programme is available online yet...)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,652 Posts
Sounds like an infomercial disguised as a motoring show. I sometimes see information segments on talk shows that are nothing but product promotions. I've got to wonder how much the "experts" are being paid to get on shows and do those spots. A lot of home and garden shows do a lot of product placement for tools, products, and businesses as well.

Having celebrities go on talk shows to promote their latest project is a long standing tradition. I believe its often written into contracts. At least they don't spend the whole segment hawking their show or book.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,757 Posts
search results have promoted results too, you cant get away from ads, no matter how hard you tried. people want stuff for free or low cost, ads help make that happen. Ads on the bus, bus stop, subway, ads on the boards in the scotia bank arena, ads in magazines, etc. you guessed it, this is part of society and we must get used to it. ads in a lot of our apps too, which helps pay for their cost
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,220 Posts
^^^^
The problem is they get to a point that there are so many ads, people go elsewhere. I've seen Android apps so full of ads that they're useless. There was one WiFi scanner app, which I paid for, to get the ad free version. It worked well, but then they changed the app and required users to pay again. That caused a big stink in the Google Play store comments and I believe that app is no longer available.

I understand those companies need to raise money somehow, but when they get to the point where they drive people away, they've gone too far. Take a look at the ads that are now in many TV shows. They sometimes cover up the subtitles that contain part of the dialog.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,652 Posts
It's also about greed. Gargle and Facebork became two of the richest companies in the world in an very short time from advertising. They could have settled for less money with lower advertising rates, less intrusive consumer tracking and more socially responsible business models but they didn't because being anything less than a multi-billionaire is not acceptable to the owners. These companies could have a market value of over a trillion dollar very soon. Broadcasters are as bad and want to become the biggest richest media conglomerates in the world so they constantly keep increasing advertising. A single Android app can generate $50,000 a week for a developer from advertising and that's just a small percentage of the total revenue generated. Advertising does little for consumers that paying a small fee wouldn't cover. Except that it's no longer a small fee due to greed.

The invasion of privacy from tracked advertising hurts consumers, small businesses, democratic governments and society in general. Advertising is nothing less than brainwashing and propaganda used by big businesses and politicians (some of whom are heavily influenced and backed by big business) to sway the behaviour of consumers and voters on a large scale.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
129 Posts
Totally agree and they wonder why people are changing their viewing habits. Not much one can do and dropping everything is not a credible option. I was raised in a country home in the late fourties without electricity, without running water, doing homework by the light of a kerosene lamp. We did have a battery operated radio. Would not want to return to that era.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
593 Posts
You can change your viewing habits as much as you want, you are still being tracked, unless you are using OTA tv without a Nielsen box.

60 Minutes had a piece on "Social Responsibility Scores" that are being implemented in China using face recognition software, this is the next level of intrusive tech. One of the funniest things in that piece was a Chinese engineer gleefully telling Scott Pelly how the technology they've developed was "just like that episode from Black Mirror", Pelly looked shocked and said something to the effect "that episode was meant to show the dystopian future and a total lack of privacy". The Chinese engineer did a double take, frowned and then said "of course" he really didn't get it, but considering the lack of freedoms in his country you can't really blame him.

I don't use Facebook, Twitter etc, but am well aware that just using the internet opens you up to all kinds of targeting, that's a price I'm willing to pay.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,757 Posts
the solution my friend, can not be done by just one company or individual, there needs to be a combination of several companies who jointly can come up with a add free or reduced add standard to take on the industry as a whole, the more people who are in on this partnership and can battle and fight the intrusiveness of overwhelming ads, and can put a smile on consumers faces by showing them results that it works, will eventually succeed in the marketplace.
 
41 - 49 of 49 Posts
Top