Canadian TV, Computing and Home Theatre Forums banner

161 - 169 of 169 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,082 Posts
The actual HDD may be fine, but the input/output errors could very well be caused by faulty on board controller. Hard drives have a chip in them. If that's the case, the hard drive is likely shot and unrepairable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
The actual HDD may be fine, but the input/output errors could very well be caused by faulty on board controller. Hard drives have a chip in them. If that's the case, the hard drive is likely shot and unrepairable.
Even though I was hearing the drive being accessed by the 9241, I think there is something wrong with it as you've said. I have made another unsuccessfull attempt by using the drive as an external drive connected to a 6131. The unit has recognized the presence of the external drive but came back quickly with a message stating an unknown error and the fact that the external HD cannot be used for recording. I think this drive is unrecoverable.
As far as I am concerned, this case is closed.

Thanks 17671 and ExDilbert for your support
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,612 Posts
Windows can sometimes be the cause of errors due to unrecognized disk layouts. I often use Linux to do things like erasing and testing a drive if it fails to work with Windows. One very useful Windows tool I use to test drives is called GSmartControl. It can read the drive's SMART information and perform surface tests. It's based on the Linux smartctl tool. The WD tools may do similar things but tend to hide some of the functionality. Erasing the disk under Linux goes something like 'dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/diskname' where /dev/diskname is the name of the actual disk device. It's fast and thorough and should only return one error when the end of the disk is reached. With a 2TB drive it may take several hours.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Windows can sometimes be the cause of errors due to unrecognized disk layouts. I often use Linux to do things like erasing and testing a drive if it fails to work with Windows. One very useful Windows tool I use to test drives is called GSmartControl. It can read the drive's SMART information and perform surface tests. It's based on the Linux smartctl tool. The WD tools may do similar things but tend to hide some of the functionality. Erasing the disk under Linux goes something like 'dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/diskname' where /dev/diskname is the name of the actual disk device. It's fast and thorough and should only return one error when the end of the disk is reached. With a 2TB drive it may take several hours.
I have used WD tools, Seagate tools and HDDguru. I have been through loading Linux Mint on a separate desktop but I am not knowledgeable enough. None of the tools were able to provide me with SMART data. On top of this, I have a hard time understanding that the tools show me a 2 TB drive, which is supposed to be 250 GB. I know that you can compress a drive but what is the point of compressing 250 GB when you can get a 1 TB for roughly 50$. Maybe this drive came from China where you can get that kind of drive according to what I have read on the net. I just don't know the origin of the drive because the 9242 was given to me for parts.
I have installed GSmartControl on Linux Mint but I can't get any information other than for the system drive. The WD drive shows as 1e40 on the desktop but that's all; no properties, nothing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,612 Posts
GSmartControl is available for Windows 10. It's based on an out of date version of smartctl but it works well with mechanical drives, not so well with SSDs. The discrepancy in disk sizes could be due to corrupted disk data, or a bug in Windows or the software. Most likely the latter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
GSmartControl is available for Windows 10. It's based on an out of date version of smartctl but it works well with mechanical drives, not so well with SSDs. The discrepancy in disk sizes could be due to corrupted disk data, or a bug in Windows or the software. Most likely the latter.
if I attach the drive to my Windows machine, it does not boot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,612 Posts
That's probably because the PC is trying to boot off the newly attached drive. You need to go into the BIOS and change the disk drive boot order.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
That's probably because the PC is trying to boot off the newly attached drive. You need to go into the BIOS and change the disk drive boot order.
I doubt. If I attach the drive to the motherboard, the disk led stays on solid as if the Bios was having a problem with the drive. If I shut down the computer and have the drive attached through USB, then the computer boots normally.
I have installed a Windows version of GSmartControl while the drive is connected through USB and here are the results:

smartctl 6.6 2017-11-05 r4594 [x86_64-w64-mingw32-w10-b19043] (sf-6.6-1)
Copyright (C) 2002-17, Bruce Allen, Christian Franke, www.smartmontools.org

=== START OF INFORMATION SECTION ===
Vendor:
Product:
Revision: 3.00
User Capacity: 2 199 023 255 040 bytes [2,19 TB]
Logical block size: 512 bytes
scsiModePageOffset: response length too short, resp_len=4 offset=4 bd_len=0
scsiModePageOffset: response length too short, resp_len=4 offset=4 bd_len=0
> Terminate command early due to bad response to IEC mode page
A mandatory SMART command failed: exiting. To continue, add one or more '-T permissive' options.


I have rerun GSC with the suggested '-T permissive' option and I have obtained the same results.
In conclusion, it looks to me that the drive is bad. All results obtained from WD tools, Seagate tools, HDDguru and now GSmartControl are consistent.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,612 Posts
I sounds like the drive controller might be bad. It could be replaced with a controller from an identical drive to see if that's the issue. Most hard drives fail due to platter issue so a controller from another failed drive might work. Then it becomes an issue of finding another drive. I wouldn't spend any money on it though.
 
161 - 169 of 169 Posts
Top