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Discussion Starter #1
hi guys,
i know the difference between the two is refresh rate and 120 mhz is obviously better, especially for fast action & sports but i just wanted to get some feedback from those of you who have had both. is 120 mhz worth spending more $ for? thanks.
 

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Short answer is yes. Discussed many times so I suggest searching for the longer answer.
 

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60 Hz won't let you play your blu-ray movies at 24 fps -- it will have to do the 2:3 pull-down (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telecine) which will result in the associated artifacts (like judder). You may not notice it until someone points it out, but once someone does, you won't be able to *not* notice it.

It actually has nothing to do with sports -- assuming you are watching a broadcast in North America, since NTSC uses a 30 frame per second rate (whether interlaced or progressive scan). An LCD with a 120 Hz refresh rate will still exhibit motion blur (again, I use "will" but you may still not even notice). The higher end sets ($$$) will do a better job than the lower-priced alternatives, but don't mistake brand-name mark-ups for quality. Many sites have customer reviews of specific models with ratings (lile review.cnet.com for example).
 

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I doubt you'll find many sets with 60 or 120 mhz (MHz? milli Hertz?) refresh rate. It's 60 or 120 Hz.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
yes james, you're right, my bad, i meant Hz not mhz.
i'm sold on 120 hz being better than 60 hz.
however one other question came up as i did further research, this is from reviews.cnet.com pertaining to 720p vs 1080p:

"In the real world, it's difficult to tell the difference between native resolutions once you get into high-definition. For example, despite the fact that a 37-inch LCD with "only" 1,366x768 pixels has to throw away a good deal of information to display a 1080i football game on CBS, you'd be hard-pressed to see more detail on a similar 37-inch LCD with 1,920x1,080 resolution."

do most hd broadcasters broadcast in 1080i or 1080p? if they broadcast in 1080i then is 720p just as good as 1080p to view that broadcast? or have the broadcasts changed to 1080p?

i know there's a lot of info on these threads, i've tried searching for these specific answers but have not had much luck so far & there's a tonne of threads to sift through... so if anyone has links which might help me with my queries i would really appreciate that rather than just telling me that it's been discussed many times and to do a search. i trust it has been discussed to death, just point me in the right direction please with a link or two. thanks.
 

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Nobody broadcasts in 1080p (at least not yet). ABC and ESPN (and maybe FOX?) broadcast 1080i, most of the rest are 720p. If you are buying a 37" screen you'd have to sit pretty close to it to be *able* to see the difference (the human eye has a limited angular resolution -- there is a chart, somewhere, that tells you the vertical resolution at a specific distance; suffice it to say that you have to sit pretty close to a 37" screen to be able to see all 1080 lines).

Resolution is something like 3rd on the list of the most imporant factors affecting picture qulality. That, too, has been discussed here.
 

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Oop, you're right. It's righty-tighty -- how does that go? ESPN is obvious because of the sports content being better suited for non-interlaced. ABC probably because they had the Monday Night Football franchise when HD came out. FOX? Who knows.
 

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while I would rather not throw away all of that resolution on a 37" if I were sitting between the optimal distance for the 1080p set (4-6ft with HD programs, 10ft with SD programs), I'll agree that resolution is lower on the priority list. Dynamic range, grayscale, colour accuracy tops the list above resolution. If your picture is dim and washed out, very blue, and colours desaturated - you will object to this far faster than 768p and the artefacts associated with converting the signal to that resolution.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
57, thanks for the links. really helpful. seems like 66% of them broadcast 1080i while the rest broadcast 720p.
in the foreseeable future will anyone broadcast in 1080p? i've read that would entail using too much bandwidth. but if & when that happens i'm guessing all 720p TVs will not be as crisp as the 1080p TVs?

and mike, yes i can see as i do more & more research that dynamic contrast and colour is more more important than 1080p vs 720p.

after hunting for a deal i found this today @ BB, what do u think?
42" toshiba plasma 1080p, 600 hz, 2,000,000:1 reg $899, on sale for $799.
is that a good deal?

there was also a 26" dynex 720p, 60 hz, reg $299 but floor model on sale $119

obviously 2 totally different TVs, but i compared them side to side (both were playing "the incredibles") and yes the toshiba 42" was a little bit sharper but you know the 26" dynex wasn't too bad. made me wonder if the 42" toshiba was really worth 7 times more than the dynex. they both come with 1 yr manufacturer warranty from BB. thoughts???
 

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in the foreseeable future will anyone broadcast in 1080p?
Probably not broadcast (although I think one or more of the satellite companies might have at least some 1080p channels), but don't forget that there are 1080p sources out there now. For example, you can get 1080p from Blu-Ray disks or by downloading movies on your Playstation 3.

Also, don't forget that most "720p" TVs are not actually 720p -- they are usually "768p", which means that both 1080 and 720 signals must be scaled.
 

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Comparing 26" to a 42" is like going car shopping and trying to decide between a Smart Car and a Ford F-150. You need to determine what size TV you want before comparing models.

Also, the Toshiba is a plasma, the Dynex is an LCD.
 

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with any quality brand, at 8' I'd be surprised if anybody can tell the difference between 1080p and 720p(768p) on a anything 50" or smaller

a lot of cheaper tvs drop resolution big time too when there is a lot of movment on the screen, still frame might be true 1080p, but a big action sequence in a movie they will drop well below 720p, some down to SD resolution,
 

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Discussion Starter #14
yeah cooper83 - i know it must seem a ridiculous comparison.
but my thinking is this:
part of me wants to get the high end plasma 42" 1080p ($899) because i feel that with a name brand the tv will last a long time. however my neighbour's sony bravia just shat the bed and the sony technician told him that it would cost over $500 to repair it so it's not worth it - he's better off buying a brand new one for $800... and the technician confessed that a surprising amount of lcd tvs need service after 2 or 3+ years.
so it's not just the cheapo brands that break down - and that combined with what steve604 said leads me to think that spending $119 on the floor model (26" 720p cheapo) might be a good idea. if in a years time i want to upgrade then i can relegate the 26" to the bedroom & buy a bigger high end tv for the living room - which will no doubt be a lot more affordable in a year.
 

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As far as I know, Toshiba has not made a plasma tv in years. The only 42 inch tvs they have are LED's according to toshiba's website.

earthshaker are you sure its not a panasonic plasma by any chance? If it is a plasma, panasonic are the leaders in plasma technology since pioneer left the market.

It is possible that the best buy store may have some old stock toshiba plasma tvs from a few years ago.
 

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Oop, you're right. It's righty-tighty -- how does that go? ESPN is obvious because of the sports content being better suited for non-interlaced. ABC probably because they had the Monday Night Football franchise when HD came out. FOX? Who knows.
Another reason could be that ABC owns ESPN.
 

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with any quality brand, at 8' I'd be surprised if anybody can tell the difference between 1080p and 720p(768p) on a anything 50" or smaller
At 50", yes, you'd be able to tell the difference. Small difference, but yes. 42" and below...I doubt it very much.
 

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I say get a 42" Panasonic plasma (not that I'm biased or anything ;)) and be done with it. I can't imagine watching anything on a 26" screen :eek: I have a feeling that once you get the 26" home, you'll be disappointed and wish you'd gone bigger - as probably mentioned in 57's FAQ. 42" should be more than satisfactory to start with.
 

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a 26" wide screen is tiny, thats like a bedroom tv or computer moniter,
I've got a 42" in my living room, it feels small to me, but it was awesome when I lived in my condo when I first got it, veiwing distance is a huge factor
and now that I've moved even the 50" in my theater/game/bar room is disappointing,

and I'm with cooper, go panasonic, I absolutely love mine, my samsung is an older model, but the 2 TV's are night and day,

I get so many complements on the picture quality of my panny,
 
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