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Discussion Starter #1
I have Amazon Prime Video and an LG UK6500 4k tv.
I live in an apartment.
The router is about 20' away with no walls in between.
The router said the signal was ~50dB.
It had a hard keeping a resolution, I think it went down to 480p a few times.
I wired it an I seem to get a stable 4k.
The wire I used is for my IPTV.
I don't want to run another cable so I was thinking of using an ethernet switch.
I already use a 10/100 ethernet switch at the router end.
router -> 10/100 switch -> wired to tv
I could have:
router -> 10/100 switch -> wired to another 10/100 switch -> wired to tv and stb (for IPTV)
OR
router -> new 10/100/1000 switch -> wired (not sure if the cable is cat5e or not) to 10/100 switch -> wired to tv and stb (for IPTV)

Does a switch divide the bandwidth between all the devices connected to it?
Is there any point in buying a 10/100/1000 switch when it is going to go through a 10/100 switch eventually?
 

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A switch will share bandwidth on an as needed basis, not proportionally according to the number of devices connected. So, if those other devices aren't doing much, then close to the full bandwidth would be available. There are a lot of factors that affect WiFi performance. You say your router has 802.11ac wireless. What about the TV? What does it support?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The tv has 802.11ac too.
I only use 5GHz (2.4 is turned off).
Should I try 2.4?
5 is on it's own channel (2.4 is congested).
 

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I'd say stick with 5. While 2.4 GHz has better range, I doubt 20' would make that much difference. Regardless, wired is always capable of better performance than WiFi. As for Gb switch, how fast is your Internet connection?
 

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Does a switch divide the bandwidth between all the devices connected to it?
Under conditions where all traffic is going to a single destination, yes. There are exceptions such as if there are multiple sources and destinations using totally different ports..

Is there any point in buying a 10/100/1000 switch when it is going to go through a 10/100 switch eventually?
That depends on the destination and the traffic going through the switch and the cables. The network could be analyzed to see what speed of switch is required. Otherwise, I'd recommend using 1GB switches throughout to ensure maximum throughput under all conditions. That's especially true if the internet service is greater than 100Mbps. Using 100Mbps switches with a 500Mbps or 1Gbps internet connection would be false economy due to the low cost of 1Gb switches compared to the cost of internet.

The router is about 20' away with no walls in between.
The router said the signal was ~50dB.
It had a hard keeping a resolution, I think it went down to 480p a few times.
I wired it an I seem to get a stable 4k.
The wire I used is for my IPTV.
Wifi should be adequate under those conditions. There may be other interference affecting the signal that does not show up on a wifi scan. A 10/100 switch should usually be capable of handling 4K at the STB/TV end. The exception may be if multiple shows are being recorded while watching streamed 4K video.
 

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I only have 50/5 internet and an LG C7OLED and it works flawlessly with Netflix and Prime 4K and the router is 20-25 feet away.
 

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I checked internet bandwidth for Prime on maximum quality. It was a 4K program with 4K TV and 4K HTPC but not sure that the stream itself was actually 4K. It peaked at 54Mbps when buffering and averaged 22Mbps. That would make 50Mbps internet close to the minimum required for 4K streaming. The wifi connection would need to be at least 50Mbps actual speed, not the stated connection speed, as well. The signal would need to be strong and either N or AC protocol to work under most circumstances.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Speed test - how fast is your internet? | DSLReports, ISP Information
run a few speedtests, and note what it says for buffer bloat.

Compare the tests of your 5GHz wifi connection vs a direct connect via ethernet to your router. And then even test direct connect to your modem (bypassing router).

Post results here.
I didn't remove the router, is that necessary?


Lots of bufferbloat on download but not much during upload.
I don't have a wifi card in my computer.
 

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With a good router and the right firmware loaded, u can get rid of the buffer bloat by utilizing some scheduler features. On Mine I have LEDE loaded, using 'piece of cake'
under SQM. And I adjust the Uplink and downlink Bandwidth until I am happy with the results.
D is pretty bad, and is typical without running a scheduler...
S/B able to tune that up for an 'A'. In which case once it is, when other people are hammering away doing something on ur network,
say ur kids, it should have minimal impact to other streams on the network.
 

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I have an ASUS RT-AC86U Router loaded with Merlin Firmware and these are my results, (sorry couldn't upload the picture):

Ping ms: 17

Download Mbps: 52.62

Upload Mbps: 4.85

Bell Canada
 

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Discussion Starter #18
My wireless AC channel was 104 and I made it channel 56 and it is fine.
A channel over 100 doesn't seem to work well.
I am using wired since I set that up. :)
 

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My LG 4K TV has ac and works perfect streaming 4K on Netflix, Amazon and Disney...and it's about 25 feet from the router.
I have 100-10 Internet...without an external router.
 
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