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Guys, he gets it. He's never expressed an intent violate the Code, but he's determined to somehow find a solution. Anything can be done, and can be made legal, even a one-off solution. Canada's requirements are not difficult or stringent, despite what a local inspector might think. For the most part, they're a good-old-boys club more interested in protecting their union brothers than public safety.

Personally, I don't think he will find one that's practical, but I gotta admire the determination. Let's respect the OP's promise to obey the Code and focus on why this can be done instead of why it cannot.
 

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Metallo,

We haven't seen you here for a while ( 2 months) and I trust you haven't burnt your neighbour's house down in the interim. If you are able to give an update, I think we would all appreciate it, especially since you got a lot of free expertise here in exchange.

So, is anybody able to explain me why in this country you can buy in any shop a transformer CE approved if it does not respect the Canadian code?

This is a direct question, hope somebody has an explanation.
I will summarize:
Just because you can buy it in a store, does not mean it should be in the store, and does not mean that it is legal to use in your intended application. You can find many things in stores that have somehow found their way there; sometimes via vendors who are simply unaware, or some who don't care. It does not have to be CSA approved to be imported into the country. It does however, have to be CSA approved to be sold.​

As for the fact that you don't want to use an external transformer, I understand that concern. You are suggesting that the high-end equipment you have is not capable of moderating the electrical power supplied to if it comes from a "dirty" transformer. I don't know about Europe, but in North America, household power is rarely "clean". It is "contaminated" with voltage spikes, drops, and other line noise all caused by transmission to your home, the other loads using the power in your home, and the other non-linear loads on the system (neighbours, motors, arc-welders, etc.)

So your aversion is questionable, since the power coming from a 240V receptacle won't have a nice wave form anyway. Most people I know that have high-end gear in Canada, have it all plugged into an active power conditioner.

Perhaps a solution to your problem if you can't get your wiring approved, is to use a "dirty" transformer, and condition the output. Of course, the conditioner would have to work with the 240V input.

Please update us.
 

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It's fairly easy to find transformers that also "condition" the power. Some are also designed to regulate voltage. Most real transformers will block spikes and noise to a certain extent. They are commonly used in hospitals and data centers with equipment that is sensitive to noise or that must be isolated for safety reasons. Maybe you are thinking of inverters, which are inherently noisy and can be unstable.
 
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