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Discussion Starter · #61 ·
I have already one of those transformers (3KW), when I came here I needed something to get some of my things going and clearly they are good for appliances that are stable in one place and do not need to be moved.

In the hi-end world the use of external transformers is considered a sort of "offense" to the quality of sound the equipment is meant to provide. Nobody would ever to that in the Hi-End audio world. Every single detail is important to the sound quality. I know it may sound funny, but at the end it pays off... although you pay a lot for quality.

In the meantime, I got confirmed by the equipment producers that the two hot wires are not an issue for circuits of my stuff, so I will just need to do things as discussed above regarding the 240V receptacles.

Regards
Alex
 

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In the meantime, I got confirmed by the equipment producers that the two hot wires are not an issue for circuits of my stuff, so I will just need to do things as discussed above regarding the 240V receptacles.
And the equipment doesn't mind 60Hz instead of 50Hz?

Because of the two hot issue, I imagine the proper way to go would be to use North American 240V plugs rather than European.

This (and the special certification sticker you'll get) would mark the equipment as "being happy" with 2-hot 60 Hz 240V.

For complete legality, I think you need to get the arrangement certified by TUV (or one of the other certifiers recognized by the NB technical authority).
 

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Metallo, we're pullin' for you.

As time goes on, equipment appears to become more tolerable of fluctuations. Look at power supplies for laptops, they are good for 90 volts to 250 volts and 50 to 60 Hz.
Metallo, just want to say we're all pullin' for you on this, and hopefully once you have it together and working you can post some pictures and any of the issues that you may have run into.
 

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Those transformers are CE approved, which means they are certified for Europe. For (100% legal) use in Canada they would need CUL or CSA approval (or special approval.) They are a very good price though. I found another site called VoltageConverters that offers an identical product and free shipping to Canada.

When going this route, it's best to get an oversized product. For example, I would get at least a 1500 watt transformer for A/V use, maybe larger. While some of the products mentioned are a good price, it's also worth considering other things such as efficiency, noise, power quality and voltage regulation. Not all transformers or inverters are suitable for use with all devices.
 

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Discussion Starter · #66 ·
Those transformers are CE certified (hopefully is not CE China Export) and distributed and sold in Canada, which lead me to think that certification has a good degree of acceptance among the countries, which make sense to me, otherwise the Canadian authorities would not allow neither the distribution nor the sale of CE products in Canada for safety, or am I missing something?

60Hz or 50Hz doesn't matter for my equipment, correction is done electronically as in most of the modern electronics.

99semaj: not that I do not want to share with this community, but we would end up in an endless discussion and certainly OT, I prefer if we stay focus on the main subject.

For sure you can advise me on the following:
When I bought the property, which is 10 years old, I asked for the electrical schematic and home plans, but much to my surprise, nobody knows where to find them and actually, everybody is very skeptical I will ever find them.
I thought every property was registered and both schematics and plans would be archived in a repository or so, but apparently I was too optimistic.
This is to say, that I have no clou how the cat5 runs in the house, or all my receptacles are linked unless I measure everything.

Can you suggest the most convenient way for me to draw a wiring plan of the existing electrical system of my house?

I am sure we will add another 50 messages here :D:D:D

Thanks folks!
Alex
 

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I thought every property was registered and both schematics and plans would be archived in a repository or so, but apparently I was too optimistic.
That may be true in Europe but not here. The original blueprints were probably drawn up by the builder and approved by the local government. Whether they keep them (or follow them) is another matter. As for electrical plans, there typically are little or none, at least none that I ever saw. The service and fixtures were placed where stated but outlets were just placed according to code, not a plan. Extras would be done, for a price, but would not exist outside of paperwork for a special order request. Unless it is a custom built house, everything is done to minimum code at minimum cost with minimal information provided to the workers. Welcome to home building in Canada. :eek:
 

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Metallo, you keep telling us about your assumptions, and they never seem to be borne out by reality or fact. Our home insurance rates go up every time someone like you causes a fire because they thought the knew better than the people that warned them. Please explain why there should be some sort of special exception for your situation. I'm waiting. :D
 

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"Those transformers are CE approved, which means they are certified for Europe. For (100% legal) use in Canada they would need CUL or CSA approval (or special approval.)"

The CE mark is a manufacturer self-declaration and is not recognized according to the Ontario Electrical Safety Code, not sure about NB.
 

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For sure you can advise me on the following:
When I bought the property, which is 10 years old, I asked for the electrical schematic and home plans, but much to my surprise, nobody knows where to find them and actually, everybody is very skeptical I will ever find them.
As I and ScaryBob said, houses usually have no electrical schematic. They are wired with mostly standard pactices, and if they meet code or better, that is enough to be legal. Code is, for the most part, that the proper materials are used, receptacles, switches, and fittings are installed in the right location, and the correct type are used, and they are installed to a certain standard of workmanship.
I thought every property was registered and both schematics and plans would be archived in a repository or so, but apparently I was too optimistic.
House plans may or may not be at municipal or county offices, for building code or assesment purposes.
This is to say, that I have no clou how the cat5 runs in the house, or all my receptacles are linked unless I measure everything.
I can almost guarantee you there is no plans on file for that
Can you suggest the most convenient way for me to draw a wiring plan of the existing electrical system of my house?
First, you can see what breakers run which receptacles or lights, by turning all the breakers off and turning each on, seeing what runs which. I would draw up a plan of the house with all the receptacles, lights, and switches, and mark whict breaker circuit they are on, and which switches run which lights.
I marked my brother's house that way, and when I changed the switces and receptacles, got a good feel for how it was wired, despite being mostly closed walls.

If you have an open basement or attic, one can make an educated guess usually. Taking off plates, and the devices if you have to, will show and indication of how the circuit may be wired.
 

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Discussion Starter · #71 ·
ScaryBob: Thank you for confirming this, basically it is what I found out during the last days. For me the code is the set of rules to follow in order to get a safe residential/commercial electrical wiring.
A schematic plan is the drawing made by the builder showing all the wiring in the house, say, same has the home plans show how the house is built. But if this is not done in Canada, I will do that myself, it is always useful to have, especially when you want to do changes.

stampeder: every time that you reply to my messages you show poor attention to what I have written.
You do affirmations that are offensive and if I were the administrator you would be kicked out of this forum immediately for your rudeness.

boatracer: that is also my question, if they are CE approved why are they sold in Canada? I do not see any CUL or CSA on mine.

Classicsat: I agree with all your points and thank you for your advice on how to do a wiring plan, I will probably follow the same route, it is very logic what you did :)
 

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Can you suggest the most convenient way for me to draw a wiring plan of the existing electrical system of my house?
Start by picking up an outlet tester at a hardware or building supply store. They are a small device with 3 LEDs and a standard 3 prong plug. Cost is about $5 so it won't break the bank. The breaker panel should be marked but it may not be. General circuits are typically 15A. Kitchen outlets will be 2 pole 15A or single pole 20A. Dryers, stoves, water heaters and A/C will be higher amperage. Just turn off one breaker at a time and see which outlets and lights don't have power.
 

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Discussion Starter · #73 ·
Yes, I am familiar with the use of a tester and if I well remember all the wires at the service panel have a label, which is good.
Indeed, I will do as suggested, it is easy and it is also fun to do, you discover how your house is built, wire by wire, stud by stud :)

Regards,
Alex
 

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At one time equipment for "Commercial Use" had to get Ontario Hydro Approval before it was put into use, even if it had CSA and CUL approval already. I haven't been there for sometime, so not sure if it is still the same.
My point is, Metello, talk to your Inspector or NB Hydro to see if they have some info, or a process that you maybe able to see if it is acceptable equipment. Someone else may have already gone through the process which would make things quite a bit easier for you.
 

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Metallo, all you have to do is take the expert advice given here willingly by me and others even if your plans will not work out the way you wanted. It is your best way to avoid trouble and to reduce difficulties for others. Never, never mess around with wiring methods that go against the Electrical Code. If you are still planning to do that, stop.
 

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Never, never mess around with wiring methods that go against the Electrical Code. If you are still planning to do that, stop.
+ 1 to stampeder's comment. I am just jumping into the last page of this thread, and I notice that the last few comments appear to be cautioning Mettalo to not go against either building code or standard practices.

I have real work experience in the industry in dealing with Ontario Hydro inspections and CSA certification. There is a reason why you want anything without those certifications to be treated with extra caution. I have seen equipment with UL and CE approvals fail inspections by a Hydro inspector. Our laws here in Canada are usually more stringent than most other governing bodies, mostly because we also have higher safety practices in place.

Mettalo, if you are trying to go against a standard safety code to effect your desire to make a product that isn't designed to safely work here, please STOP! Your life and your family's life MUST be worth more than whatever you are trying to make.

If you are not sure that whatever you built is safe or not, please contact you local provincial Hydro office, and ask for an inspection. Based on previous comments, price doesn't seem to be too much of a concern, so spend a few bucks more to make sure it's safe too. Your neighbours, who may be the ones that will need to rescue you out of your burning house, will appreciate it.
 

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^^^^

Agree with everything you say with the exception of Canadas governing bodies being more stringent. That has not been my experience.
 

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Discussion Starter · #78 ·
TechieFreak:
I understand what you say, but clearly you didn't go through all the comments, otherwise you would have read that I am ready to respect the "easy" rules you have here.

As far as the rules over wiring in Canada are concerned, I have been living in different countries and after having visited a number of homes here in Canada, I think I can at least express my opinion, correct?
I can tell you that "stringent" doesn't really fit to what I have seen so far and I am not at all surprised why houses go on fire so often here.
When you see flying sockets in a garage with wiring not fixed properly I am scared to death.
When you see flying wiring in the boiler room or uncovered sockets in basements I am also scared to death.

This is because:

1) It is dangerous
2) Because houses here are wooden made and not in concrete, so I would expect the "highest standard of safety".

I thought it was a case at the beginning, but now I see it is almost the rule and I am concerned because it means that there are no controls.
So you may have the code properly done, but without controls you are at square one.

Having said that, I like to do things myself, it is not a question of money, you do things to get satisfaction for what you are doing and in my case because the level of safety I will set will be definitely higher than the average of the houses I see every day.

The inspector will judge what I have done, so please, stop writing that I want to do things against the code, because this is nonsense.

So, is anybody able to explain me why in this country you can buy in any shop a transformer CE approved if it does not respect the Canadian code?

This is a direct question, hope somebody has an explanation.

Thank you

Alex
 

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Techifreak is sayin not only to get your 240V receptacle installation inspected and approved, but the foreign appliances you wish to run off of Canadian 240V also, and especially them.
 

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I've asked you direct questions all along, Metallo, and so have other members, and you don't seem to reply with a sufficiently sober and well considered respect for the seriousness of the issue you've raised. Take our advice, and engage us in conversation. We all win that way. :)
 
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