World could run out of Internet Addresses in 2012

This week, the IDG news service reports The Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) assigned two blocks of IPv4 addresses to the Asia-Pacific Network which leaves just five (out of 256) major address blocks to be allocated.

Under IANA rules, each of the five regional internet registries (African, America, Asia-pacific, Latin America/Caribbean and Europe/Middle East/Central Asia) will receive one of the remaining blocks.

Available Internet addresses could be exhausted by 2012

The Number Resource Organization (NRO), the coordinating group that oversees the allocation of Internet number resources around the world, announced today that less than 5 percent of available IPv4 addresses remain unallocated.

Just nine months ago, the group warned that the number had fallen below 10 percent and that the world could run out of internet addresses by 2012 if the transition to the next-generation Internet Protocol (IPv6) was not undertaken soon.

NRO warns the world is running out of internet addresses

The Number Resource Organization (NRO), the coordinating group that oversees the allocation of Internet number resources around the world, announced today that less than 10 percent of available IPv4 addresses remain unallocated.

The group is warning that with so few IPv4 addresses remaining, immediate planning for the implementation of the next-generation Internet Protocol (IPv6) is now required or the world could run out of internet addresses.