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Thread: Sale of Android boxes To Obtain "Free TV" Is Now Illegal In Canada. Reply to Thread
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  Topic Review (Newest First)
2019-09-17 05:47 AM
bev fan They were recommending apps at Canada Computers that don’t need Kodi to watch movies and shows. Some of those apps have similar interface to Netflix.
2019-09-16 11:14 PM
ExDilbert It's NOT illegal to put Kodi on an Android box and sell it. Kodi is a legal media player similar to Windows Media Center that Microsoft bundled with Windows for years. What IS illegal is to also install a Kodi plugin designed to pirate copyrighted material or to sell subscriptions to illegal pirating services. Kodi is not required to download or watch pirated programming. There are a other ways to do that without Kodi and without Android.

Android boxes are used because they are cheap, easy to modify and provide a big markup. Banning Android TV boxes would be like banning cars because bank robbers use them as getaway vehicles. Licensed BDUs also use Android boxes for their IPTV services and their software is similar in concept to Kodi.

Kodi gets picked on because people see it running pirate software plugins and don't know enough about the technology to differentiate the two. It's like saying Windows Media Player should be banned because they saw someone playing an illegally downloaded movie with it. They didn't see the movie being downloaded from the pirate site so they think Windows Media Player is the culprit.
2019-09-16 07:44 PM
bev fan I know from my own experience that Canada Computers employees have been encouraging customers to buy hardware and were informing them how to get the apps to watch free tv.
What is very funny to me is that Vmedia, Tv and internet provider has been informing their customers on their forum how to download those apps on their android players and Teksavvy has gone to court to protect the rights of pirates.
This is what I am always talking about that piracy is seen as something normal in this country and is being encouraged by family members, coworkers friends and now even by big business. LOL.
2019-09-16 05:09 PM
NeilN
Quote:
Originally Posted by ExDilbert View Post
Why not computers that have been modified for piracy and put on a shelf for sale?
I'm disputing the companies/employees modified the devices for piracy and put them on the shelf to be sold. Pre-loading the device with Kodi (either by the manufacturer (likely) or employees (doubtful)), which was the assertion made, is not illegal or make them "pirate devices".
2019-09-16 03:49 PM
ExDilbert I believe that items that are used in the commission of a crime can be confiscated and destroyed. Proceeds from criminal activities can also be confiscated. That may include many items such as buildings, automobiles, boats, etc. If the law is strictly enforced, that could theoretically include entire businesses if their assets were primarily obtained through criminal activities. Why not computers that have been modified for piracy and put on a shelf for sale?
2019-09-16 02:30 PM
NeilN
Quote:
Originally Posted by 57 View Post
If you read post 778, it discusses how this was handled by the businesses in question.
That's nowhere close to "The investigation also revealed that selling the devices preloaded with Kodi software enables pirating of copyrighted content right off the shelf..."

If I walk into Best Buy and have the salesperson show me how to install whatever software hooks into these pirate streams on a HP computer that does not mean HP are going to get their computers destroyed because they are preloaded with software enabling pirating of copyrighted content right off the shelf.
2019-09-16 02:08 PM
As Is What a joke. They don't seem to know much about the internet.
Google " how to pirate movies" and see all the videos and websites explaining all you need to know.
Then go to Best Buy and ask for the device that google, reddit, youtube etc recommend. That's probably where they got their information to begin with. Sue google.

My firestick does all that and more. Do I have to destroy it?
2019-09-16 01:47 PM
Inglewood I worked for a major Canadian retailer in the 90's that sold grey/black market U.S. satellite dishes, and as a sales rep we were told to openly sell them as "free" and we even updated smart cards in the store for customers when there boxes would go down.

The store had a display where customers could play with a box, see what channels came with it, and we went through the process of how to get there cards working again if they went down.

I'm assuming nothing has changed in 20-25 years.

A hammer can be used for many legitimate uses also, but if the sales rep at a hardware store tells you how to use it to break into cars and kill someone instead of hitting a nail, there is some culpability...
2019-09-16 12:53 PM
57
Quote:
Originally Posted by NeilN View Post
...add-ons are needed...
If you read post 778, it discusses how this was handled by the businesses in question.
Quote:
The lengthy investigation found that all four stores were complicit in promoting, educating, or instructing consumers on how to download and stream illegal content (series, movies, TV channels) onto Pirate Devices using Kodi software, without payment to the legitimate copyright owner or broadcaster
2019-09-16 10:50 AM
NeilN "The investigation also revealed that selling the devices preloaded with Kodi software enables pirating of copyrighted content right off the shelf..."

From what I've read in this thread, this is simply not true (add-ons are needed) or Super Channel is treating something like a web browser as software enabling pirating. The court case should be interesting (and hopefully whoever is handing down the judgement has the technical chops to make an informed decision).
2019-09-16 09:52 AM
Dr.Dave Super Channel just issued a press release this morning - the full text follows. The statement of claim PDF is also available. (T-1486-19)

Allarco Entertainment launches lawsuit against four major Canadian retailers for promoting content piracy

Super Channel President and CEO, Don McDonald, today announced that Allarco Entertainment 2008 Inc., has stepped to the forefront in the war against content piracy by launching a lawsuit against four major Canadian retailers complicit in the promotion of the downloading and streaming of illegal content on internet streaming devices ("Pirate Devices") sold to customers in their stores.

The lawsuit comes after a 19-month undercover investigation carried out coast-to-coast, of in-store practices by sales personnel, including supervisors and managers, in Best Buy, Staples, Canada Computers, and London Drugs retail outlets, with over 100 hours of audio and video recorded surveillance, documenting 150 events supporting the claim.

The lawsuit was filed in the Federal Court on September 11, 2019. To view the statement of claim and to view a video of the investigation, visit: Change the Culture

"After FairPlay Canada's application to block illegal pirating websites was denied by the CRTC, I felt that something else needed to be done in the war against content piracy," said Don McDonald, President and CEO of Super Channel. "When we discovered that employees from major retailers were actively promoting the downloading and streaming of illegal content to their customers when selling Pirate Devices with Kodi software, we decided to take a closer look and were shocked at what we found. There is a complacency around this issue with these retailers that needs to be addressed. Our goal is to lead in changing the culture around the acceptance of content piracy. People need to be aware that it is actual stealing; it is not a victimless crime and should be treated as such."

The lengthy investigation found that all four stores were complicit in promoting, educating, or instructing consumers on how to download and stream illegal content (series, movies, TV channels) onto Pirate Devices using Kodi software, without payment to the legitimate copyright owner or broadcaster. In some cases, customers were referred to services that could assist them with the process. The investigation also revealed that selling the devices preloaded with Kodi software enables pirating of copyrighted content right off the shelf, including Super Channel series including The Oath and others.

Mr. McDonald hopes that by taking action against these retailers, it will help to change the culture surrounding the issue of content piracy and raise awareness of the issue.

"I felt we couldn't continue to sit back and knowingly allow these retail practices to continue" he stated. "We must take action and encourage all other broadcasters and industry partners to join us. We want the devices removed from the shelves and destroyed. We want each of the stores to adopt and enforce a strict employee policy which will prohibit their employees from engaging, educating, and promoting content piracy at work and at home, and for the public to realize that when they are acquiring content using these devices, without paying for it legitimately, they are stealing."

To that end, Super Channel recently enforced its own Employee Anti-Piracy Policy in which all employees and contractors working with the company must agree to not download, stream or watch illegally acquired content, at the workplace or at home, as a condition of employment. Mr. McDonald hopes that other broadcasters, distributors, and content producers in the industry will soon follow suit.

Mr. McDonald will be discussing his views on this issue with members of the Canadian Communications Systems Alliance while attending the CCSA Connect conference this week in Kelowna, BC.

None of the allegations have been proven in Court. A motion record containing an affidavit that sets out the extensive evidence gathered, including undercover surveillance, will soon be filed.
2019-09-15 02:18 PM
NeilN "Super Channel... wants a permanent injunction to prevent Best Buy, Staples, Canada Computers and London Drugs from selling and promoting "pirate devices."

Too much of an overreach, by far. Award damages for promoting and showing customers how to access pirated content, sure, but you can't stop the sale of devices which themselves are legal. It would be like preventing the sales of PCs because some salespeople showed customers how to use torrents and websites to access pirated software and streams.
2019-09-15 02:00 PM
ExDilbert They are not being sued or charged for selling Android boxes. They are being sued or charged for installing or promoting the installation of illegal streaming apps and providing or promoting illegal streaming services. I doubt that the companies involved have official policies of promoting the use of pirate TV services. It's probably taking place at the store level in order to boost sales figures.
2019-09-15 01:22 PM
MCIBUS If android boxes(those that sell them) are being charged , then so should every single TV manufacturing that make/sell smart tv and those that sell those TV should be charged as you can add These"features" obtaining 'fre TV' as well as internet providers that you can access these sites.
2019-09-15 11:04 AM
Exid0r
Best Buy, Staples accused of 'urging' customers to pirate TV shows with devices

From CBC News · Posted: Sep 15, 2019

Best Buy, Staples accused of 'urging' customers to pirate TV shows with devices sold in stores

Quote:
Premium TV network Super Channel has filed a lawsuit against four Canadian retailers for allegedly selling "pirate devices" and educating customers how to use them to watch TV without paying for it.

In a court document filed in Federal Court this week, Super Channel accuses Best Buy, Staples, Canada Computers and London Drugs of copyright infringement, claiming their employees are "urging" customers to pirate online content using streaming devices that are sold in store.
From same article, a short update on a related case (that started this thread over three years ago):

Quote:
The lawsuit is just the latest attempt to curb piracy in Canada. In 2016, Bell, Rogers and Videotron launched a legal battle in Federal Court, targeting smaller dealers who sell Android boxes pre-loaded with software used to pirate content.

The case is ongoing and the list of defendants has ballooned from five in 2016 to more than 130 today.
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