Netflix is good but may not satisfy everyones needs - Page 3 - Canadian TV, Computing and Home Theatre Forums

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post #31 of 38 (permalink) Old 2014-08-06, 08:53 PM
 
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That's why I mentioned "grey area": it would be hard to replace Blu-ray quality,
but getting a DVD-quality video (of almost anything) even in 2011 was a piece of cake...

Today the internet is legislated as a human right is some Scandinavian countries (I think)...

Yes, if you are addicted to something like live sports, you have a hard time to cut the cord.
But then again, there were times when people couldn't live without LPs, later - without cassettes, etc.

Like with any addiction, you need to make the first step...
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post #32 of 38 (permalink) Old 2014-08-06, 10:59 PM
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An HTPC can bring the internet - and everything it has - to your TV.
Agreed. I have had an HTPC hooked up to HDTV for about 10 years. I even used the HTPC to record HD before HD PVRs were available in Canada. It plays OTA HDTV (live and recorded), DVDs, BDs, Netflix, Youtube, TMN Go and just about any content available on the internet. The quality is as good as the source, up to 1080p with DD5.1 or DTS5.1. With a better AV receiver it would also do lossless formats. I still subscribe to Rogers though. Their PVRs are just low quality HTPCs but are required due to the encryption lock down enforced by copyright holders.

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using an HTPC would be considered cheating
I disagree. It's just a PC hooked up to a really big monitor. If I choose to watch Netflix on it. It's still the internet, not TV.
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post #33 of 38 (permalink) Old 2014-08-07, 10:38 AM
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Originally Posted by four View Post
That's why I mentioned "grey area": it would be hard to replace Blu-ray quality,
but getting a DVD-quality video (of almost anything) even in 2011 was a piece of cake...

Today the internet is legislated as a human right is some Scandinavian countries (I think)...

Yes, if you are addicted to something like live sports, you have a hard time to cut the cord.
But then again, there were times when people couldn't live without LPs, later - without cassettes, etc.

Like with any addiction, you need to make the first step...
So if someone likes sports it makes him an addict, how about cord cutter who spends all day on the Internet watching netflix and other content. I would say cord cutters are the real addicts as their lives revolve around searching for content, finding ways to pirate content and working on bypassing geo blocking. This could be beyond addiction and becamming an obsession.
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post #34 of 38 (permalink) Old 2014-08-07, 10:49 AM
 
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I would say cord cutters are the real addicts...
Sure.
So, when addiction is inevitable, why not have one that costs less?
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post #35 of 38 (permalink) Old 2014-08-07, 11:29 AM
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Reminder that this forum does not allow piracy discussion. While we do permit grey-market solutions like VPNs and DNS services, posts on outright piracy will result in immediate infractions.

To clarify, since some people seem to struggle with this - it is permissible to discuss piracy as an abstract concept affecting the industry - ie "The film industry is really being hurt by content piracy" or "Sony's new DRM scheme is an effort to combat rampant piracy of their music." It is not permissible to discuss detailed methods of pirating content, nor is it permissible to in any way advocate piracy. Essentially, if your post mentions a piracy source or in any way suggests that piracy is a viable potential solution to sourcing content, you will be issued an infraction. If you see a post that you believe violates the above, report it. Responding will result in an infraction as well.

If you are still unsure about what you can and cannot mention, send me a PM. Posts here on the matter will result in infractions.

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Last edited by TorontoColin; 2014-08-08 at 10:34 AM.
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post #36 of 38 (permalink) Old 2014-08-07, 01:37 PM
 
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I would say cord cutters are the real addicts as their lives revolve around searching for content, finding ways to pirate content and working on bypassing geo blocking. This could be beyond addiction and becamming an obsession.
This is like saying someone is a pirate because they cross border shop to buy cheaper goods or goods not available in Canada.

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post #37 of 38 (permalink) Old 2014-08-08, 11:18 AM
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I have a number of friends who have cord cut.
1 of them.. almost purely does it via Piracy... which I don't advocate at all
2 others, are mostly legit, filled in with the grey area stuff (US VPN/DNS, etc).

But really in the end.. it comes down to what the person is watching, their watching habbits, etc.. and HOW they want to watch the TV.

A friend of ours, really wants to cut the cord.. but he watches a TON of different live sports (live, doesn't like recording them, etc), OTA isn't a good option here (not a lot of channels, etc)... comes down that he would lose out on too much.

My wife is fairly technically inclined... as well as myself being VERY inclined. We could easily in a pinch switch over to a cut the cord.. knowing enough to handle the technology behind it.

But do we WANT to? For some of it, people don't realize the CONVIENENCE of cable, vs the other methods.
Yes, you will save a lot of $$ potentially by cutting. BUT there is a BIG change in your watching habits you need to be prepared for.

Cable.. you turn on one device... you tune to channel X and away you go (or off your pvr, etc).
With cutting.. its a BIG change over. Certain things, may be via OTA.. so might be direct to your TV input, or via a HDhomerun, etc. Now you want to watch this other show... wait that's on a different method, have to turn on this device or app, to watch it via Netflix, etc.

It takes a little more work/organization... not everyone wants the hassle

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post #38 of 38 (permalink) Old 2014-08-08, 12:39 PM
 
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Was it Karl Marx or one of his teachers that said to look for the beneficiary to explain any financial decisions?

If your household income is $100K/year and all the TV you like is ~$1K/year it's a rounding error.
Unless you really like geeky/nerdy activities, you won't look into cord cutting and other similar potentially (!) $$-saving activities. And you shouldn't!
If you really want to feel frugal, just cut one going out dinner+movie event with your significant other and it's paid for!

What really amuses me, is how often a rational explanation is sought for this behavior. Why?
"I have the money. I spend it the way I like. End of story". Why to be ashamed of?

RE: piracy in the audio/video space.
I believe this was born as a purely North American phenomenon that got spread worldwide.

Look at Europe: they have well established standards for video transmission (DVB-T, DVB-S, DVB-C)
and all players have to obey by them. You can buy a extension card, plug it into your computer
and watch all that on your PC. Buying some encrypted programming? Plug the CAM into the
same card and proceed as usual. Applies to terrestrial, satellite and cable programming.

Why is it so messed up in North America? Will I reveal a national secret if I say this way the consumers are milked "better"?
Maybe then they (who makes money!) shouldn't be surprised that the satellite programming gets hacked. Again and again!
What an exercise in self-humiliation was the CableCard "initiative"!

Same about mobile standards. Europe runs 95%+ on GSM, it works better and costs less.

Since the US can buy the smartest brains (but not always employ them), some are used to develop Napster. Hack Nagra. Develop BitTorrent.

I recall reading about the main reason Daimler-Chrysler duo fell apart:
the gap between the highest and lowest wage (janitor to president) at Mercedes is ten times less than at Chrysler!

I believe there is one reason why NA habits spread to Europe and not the other way around: Hollywood.
They do produce the most successful shows/movies/sitcoms/etc.

And Netfilx is the "trojan horse" in this expansion...

/rant

Last edited by TorontoColin; 2014-08-08 at 01:44 PM. Reason: language
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