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post #44 of (permalink) Old 2012-03-08, 09:46 AM Thread Starter
mrvanwinkles
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Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Eastern Ontario (Ottawa/Kingston)
Posts: 2,003
Again, I'm sorry that we may not all necessarily agree on some of the things discussed.

Anyway ... Learning ...

Learning that ...

Ethernet Port (physical port) Quality of Service, QoS, on many of the "home" routers - the Manual Kbs speed setting / value - can be quite a "tricky" or "sensitive" setting - and one must be careful how one sets this.

Careful - cause I'm learning that this setting on the router is the "Upstream" speed limit setting.

In other words - "Upstream" - the speed that computer on the Home network, the "LAN" side, can send DATA "UP" towards the internet.

This Upstream speed is usually a much smaller speed than the "Downstream" speed.

("Downstream" speed, is the speed that you can receive DATA *from* the internet / ISP to the computer/device on the home network / LAN side.)

They recommend doing several "speed tests" to see what sort of Upstream speeds you are actually getting up to your ISP. Average those numbers. And that can give you a initial guide on what sort of MANUAL settings you might try.

examples / numbers like 300 kbs or 900 kbs Upstream are shown.

It depends on your service - what kind of speed your ISP is giving you / and or what kind of speed you are actually getting. [possibly what data and speed "plan" / level of service you have with your ISP]

Actual speed measured can vary with other things too - I'm sure. Time of day. Other traffic. What services you're trying to use on the net, what websites / servers you're sending data to ... etc.

Anyway ... they recommend - for manual settings on a VOIP device - try 90% of your average speed measured. And they claim this will help avoid "choppy" voice on VOIP.

Trying to determine good settings to slow down one physical connection a little - one physical connection that's using alot too much bandwidth - that could be a different matter. Might be tricky.

But in any case ... we have some ideas for determining some starting numbers.

I hope I have understood this correctly ...
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