Bell Satellite Could Be Phased Out Soon? (not true) - Page 3 - Canadian TV, Computing and Home Theatre Forums

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post #31 of 46 (permalink) Old 2018-01-27, 06:37 PM
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Its to bad SD didn't use the same system as Bell, if they did and Bell sold BTV to them.

1) not only would SD gain access to 2 more sats but they could upgrade to the Hopper &Joey(If smart)

2) they could add way more channels by re-organizing the Nimiq sats.

But I doubt that will happen.

Lets face it days of satellite is more or less over.

With the government/CRTC new regulations on having high speed internet in rural areas with in 10 years even the rural areas(excluding extreme remote areas), so even in rural areas will be "technically" available.

Cable companies are basically will turn to IPTV as have the phone companies. Shaw cable will eventually stop investing in SD and const rate on IPTV.

The only way I see Sat TV serving in Canada us if a third party buys both and invest millions with 4K technology.

If Bell was to suddenly invest in BTV by getting the Hopp
Hopper & Joey & 4K receivers from Dish/Echostar, those in rural areas and perhaps SD subs would go with BTV.

BTV is limited in Band width, but that could easily be resolved. Though it might cost them switch everything to MPEG 4(Dish did this for their eastern Arc and gave all subs MPEG 4 receivers),get ride of tons of VU/PPV channels, and terminate the agreement with Dish for the lease of 72.5 and use it themselves.

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post #32 of 46 (permalink) Old 2018-01-27, 07:42 PM
 
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OK let's look at 3 more examples:

1)Brazil. Granted Brazil's population is much bigger than ours, but they have FIVE (5) companies providing satellite TV... SKY (satellite television), Claro TV (satellite television), VIVO TV (cable/IPTV/satellite television), Oi TV (satellite television) and GVT TV (IPTV/satellite television). Like Canada, the customers are becoming smaller in numbers because of internet, but it shows one that 2 providers is not that unusual.

2)South Africa has 2 satellite providers.

3)England has 3 satellite providers and they are much more urban than Canada. Sky TV , Freesat from Sky, is a free satellite service owned by Sky plc., and Freesat. Freesat is a free satellite service created jointly by the BBC and ITV. Like Sky, it provides high definition content, digital recording and video on demand via a broadband connection.
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post #33 of 46 (permalink) Old 2018-01-27, 08:28 PM
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The same could be said about IPTV that it’s days are numbered. Future could be streaming services only like Netflix, Crave Tv and individual streaming channels like CBC tv to name a few. Some services like News channels or sports channels could get together and provide streaming service bypassing Bell or Rogers or any other BDU.

In my opinion until there is demand for satellite system in Canada it will be in service.
In case that satellites will be losing money they will be subsidized by other customers like OTA is now. One way or another customers in areas with no cable or IPTV will have to have satellite service available in my opinion.

Last edited by bev fan; 2018-01-27 at 08:55 PM.
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post #34 of 46 (permalink) Old 2018-01-27, 10:49 PM
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The US has had 5 or 6 satellite services since satellite TV was first launched. It's down to two. Even after the original shakeout that left it with two, a third launched and it failed financially, eventually being bought by Dish.

It's interesting to note that the largest satellite TV providers in Brazil is Sky, a non-Brazilian company. Another company, Claro, appears to serve many South American companies. If Canada had that type of open competition we would have more satellite providers as well. That is at least until DirecTV and Dish put our lame, substandard satellite BDUs out of business.

The UK doesn't really have 3 satellite services. Sky is the only commercial satellite TV operator. Freesat is subsidized by the BBC and ITV. It's similar in concept to the CBC and Canada's other commercial OTA networks making their OTA channels available via satellite. That's something that probably should be done in Canada but Canada's OTA broadcasters are owned by greedy companies that also own BDUs and want Canadians to pay excessive amounts for basic TV. The basic TV package mandated by the CRTC is the closest thing in Canada but in the UK it is completely FTA.

In addition to Freesat, there is Freeview, an almost identical service offered OTA and over cable. OTA TV is delivered by antenna farms that carry all services with 90% national coverage. It's nothing like Canada where there are huge gaps in OTA services in most urban areas that led to high cable TV penetration. It's interesting to note that the UK's largest cable TV provider has only 3.5 million subscribers and there are only 4 cable TV services. That's in a country of 63 million people so cable TV penetration is very low. That's most likely why satellite does so well there. It's also interesting to note that Sky UK carries a large number of US channels. It's not like Canada where a handful of government protected BDUs have formed a broadcasting cartel to keep out virtually any and all competition.
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post #35 of 46 (permalink) Old 2018-01-28, 04:52 AM
 
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Originally Posted by NovaMan View Post
3)England has 3 satellite providers and they are much more urban than Canada. Sky TV , Freesat from Sky, is a free satellite service owned by Sky plc., and Freesat. Freesat is a free satellite service created jointly by the BBC and ITV. Like Sky, it provides high definition content, digital recording and video on demand via a broadband connection.
FreeSat is nothing more than an EPG, it uses licensed Receivers to decode the EPG data, otherwise FreeSat is EXACTLY the same as FTA from the same birds, nothing more.

It is the EXACT same signal, same birds, so how can it be classed as a 2nd provider? Sky being number 1.

Then the example you use as the 3rd provider reads the same as the 2nd? FreeSat?

Do you mean FreeView? If so this uses NO Satellites at all but is in fact a Digital Terrestrial OTA Service, which carries most of the same programming as FreeSat. It is ostensibly available via an Antenna, or can be obtained via a STB connected to a Broadband Feed.

As for Channels available;

Sky TV has the most, followed by FreeSat, then FreeView.

Almost all TV's come with built-in Tuners for FreeView (some with a PVR function), and others have FreeSat or FTA Tuners, again, some with PVR capabilities.

So, England actually only has 1 Satellite Service Provider, it had a second one but that merged with Sky many years ago, AFAIK.
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post #36 of 46 (permalink) Old 2018-01-28, 05:02 AM
 
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It's interesting to note that the UK's largest cable TV provider has only 3.5 million subscribers and there are only 4 cable TV services. That's in a country of 63 million people so cable TV penetration is very low.
Correct, although to be honest, Cable TV is still relatively new in England, only becoming established in the early 90's, when in order to get into the market, cable providers had to install a brand new infrastructure. It is also worth noting that unlike Canada, the cable network is almost entirely buried, there are no overhead cable routes, no joint user poles etc. Just like the telephone network, 99% of all lines are underground, so hanging some Coaxial Cables from Pole to Pole and then taps to feed drops into houses could not be done, everything had to be dug into the ground. Sadly, they did it on the cheap when they started and it was almost all direct buried cable, so any repairs or damage involves/involved digging up roadways etc.

They also insist on using different Coax and sizes to Canadian/North American Standards for some odd reason....lol
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post #37 of 46 (permalink) Old 2018-01-28, 03:36 PM
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Cable TV was a largely Canadian phenomenon for many years. It was due to a combination of poor OTA service from Canadian networks combined with fringe reception availability of US channels using sophisticated OTA equipment. Most other countries didn't get cable TV in urban areas until much later when cable only TV channels were launched. Cable channel expansion in the 1980s and 1990s created the market for cable TV in urban areas and it became widely available in the US and elsewhere.

Canadian broadcasters pretty much created the market for cable TV in Canada by being so negligent in providing good OTA service for Canadians. In the 1960s, most markets in the US had 3 or 4 OTA stations, large markets many more, while Canadians had to put up with one or two stations in similarly sized markets. Not much has changed in that respect. We can still get more OTA channels from the US with better programming on better managed stations and networks. Canada remains one of the few countries in the world that makes it illegal to receive satellite services from another country. Otherwise, Canadian satellite services might not have survived the first few years.
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post #38 of 46 (permalink) Old 2018-01-28, 05:52 PM
 
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Interesting list of dbs providers in the world here from Wikipedia.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...United_Kingdom


Note, they say the United Kingdom has 2 providers that share the same equipment: Sky and Freesat..
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post #39 of 46 (permalink) Old 2018-01-28, 07:41 PM
 
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Canada remains one of the few countries in the world that makes it illegal to receive satellite services from another country. Otherwise, Canadian satellite services might not have survived the first few years.
True but that was not the reason. Our government feels we must watch "Canadian content" programming else we become Americanized.
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post #40 of 46 (permalink) Old 2018-01-28, 08:06 PM
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That is not true statement at all. It is illegal in the states to have another satellite service but also the same goes for every country in Europe and probably many more around the world.
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post #41 of 46 (permalink) Old 2018-01-28, 08:50 PM
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@dsspredator : More people than you might think. If you're on sat. or cable you can still watch most channels in SD if you want to. The old TVs can still be hooked up through legacy connectors to most modern TV boxes. I've even heard of people who have new HD sets who still watch the SD channel instead of the HD equivalent. They just don't see the need to change their long standing habits or memorize a new set of channel numbers.
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post #42 of 46 (permalink) Old 2018-01-29, 12:26 AM
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Originally Posted by bev fan View Post
...It is illegal in the states to have another satellite service...
Clarification. Due to broadcaster rights, the Canadian Satellite service providers (Bell/SD) are not allowed to "broadcast" into the US, hence the recent satellite changes that do not allow certain signals to go far into the US, however, US citizens are allowed to receive satellite signals without being criminals, unlike Canadians.

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post #43 of 46 (permalink) Old 2018-01-29, 12:52 AM
 
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If the Canadian government didn't have content rules I think the US satellite services would certainly be offering their services here. Just like we have HBO Canada we would have DISH Canada.
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post #44 of 46 (permalink) Old 2018-01-29, 09:17 AM
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Originally Posted by 57 View Post
Clarification. Due to broadcaster rights, the Canadian Satellite service providers (Bell/SD) are not allowed to "broadcast" into the US, hence the recent satellite changes that do not allow certain signals to go far into the US, however, US citizens are allowed to receive satellite signals without being criminals, unlike Canadians.
True, but I haven’t heard that any Dish customer in Canada have been charged and we still have many of them as some of them have disclosed it on this forum.
I remember when and why this law was passed. At the time dealers for Dish and Direct Tv pirate and legit subscription were all over the place and every second house had American dish installed. Government had to do something to protect Canadian providers.
I am pretty sure if it was the other way around US government would have acted more swiftly severely as we can see now how they treat Canadian business and trade.
Anyways, if Bell or Shaw have invested in more advanced hardware like American counterparts, I would gladly switch to satellite service but like someone said before we probably do not have enough population to support the investment.
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post #45 of 46 (permalink) Old 2018-01-29, 11:56 AM
 
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I find this discussion very interesting, even though I am not a Bell Satellite customer. As a Shaw Direct patron, I hope that Bell Satellite continues. It is in the best interest of all satellite DTH customers that the competition continues.

As for those of you in urban areas, I don't blame you for switching to other methods for receiving your video entertainment, but for those of us in rural areas, we continue to rely on satellites to bring us the majority of our TV signals, and we like the fact that there is provider competition.

We are thankful for the urban people who choose satellite because it helps to keep our prices lower, but we also realize that people in cities have much more choice. Let's keep the competition alive and argue against monopolies.
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