Paralympic Winter Games TV Schedule announced

Canada’s Olympic Broadcast Media Consortium announced today it would broadcast fifty-seven hours of high-definition television coverage of the Vancouver 2010 Paralympic Winter Games in English and French.

The Games take place March 12 to 21 in Vancouver and Whistler and will feature approximately 650 athletes from more than 40 countries taking part in five sports: alpine skiing, cross-country skiing, sledge hockey, wheelchair curling, and biathlon.

The group’s offering includes 27 hours of coverage in English on CTV, TSN and Rogers Sportsnet as well as 30 hours of coverage in French on RDS and RIS Info Sports.

Highlights include the Opening Ceremony, live coverage of Team Canada’s sledge hockey games and a daily 90-minute recap show with all of the day’s highlights, results and medal standings.

“Along with live event coverage and highlights, we will tell the athletes’ stories of determination and accomplishments, as they go for gold in 2010.” said Keith Pelley, President of Canada’s Olympic Broadcast Media Consortium.

The English broadcast team for the 2010 Paralympic Winter Games features Brian Williams as host of the Opening Ceremony, Dave Randorf as play-by-play announcer for sledge hockey games with Jake Snyder and Mark Gallant as analysts, while Jamie Campbell hosts the highlights show.

The Consortium’s coverage will also be available on TAC (The Accessible Channel), a digital television service for people who are blind, vision-impaired, deaf or hard of hearing, and on Voiceprint, an audio newsstand that broadcasts top stories from Canadian newspapers and magazines into Canadian homes.

The following is the broadcast schedule for the Vancouver 2010 Paralympic Winter Games. (all times are Eastern time so be sure to check your local program guide for confirmation)

Saturday, March 13

Opening Ceremony
– 2 p.m. ET on CTV, RIS Info Sports

Sledge Hockey: Canada vs. Italy
– 1 p.m. ET on Rogers Sportsnet Pacific (live)
– 4 p.m. ET on CTV and RIS Info Sports

Sunday, March 14

Sledge Hockey: Canada vs. Sweden
– 4:30 p.m. ET on Rogers Sportsnet (national) (live)
– 8 p.m. ET on RIS Info Sports
– 12 midnight ET on RDS

Daily Highlights
– 3 p.m. ET on CTV
– 10 p.m. ET on RDS

Monday, March 15

Daily Highlights
– 3:30 p.m. ET on TSN
– 4:30 p.m. ET on RDS

Tuesday, March 16

Sledge Hockey: Canada vs. Norway
– 11:30 p.m. ET on TSN and RDS (live)

Daily Highlights
– 2 a.m. ET on Rogers Sportsnet East
– 2:30 a.m. ET on Rogers Sportsnet Ontario
– 4:30 p.m. ET on RDS
– 5:30 p.m. ET on Rogers Sportsnet West
– 6:30 p.m. ET on Rogers Sportsnet Pacific

Wednesday, March 17

Daily Highlights

– 1:30 a.m. ET on Rogers Sportsnet Ontario
– 2 a.m. ET on Rogers Sportsnet East
– 4:30 p.m. ET on RDS
– 5:30 p.m. ET on Rogers Sportsnet West
– 6:30 p.m. ET on Rogers Sportsnet Pacific

Thursday, March 18

Sledge Hockey Semifinals

– 3 p.m. ET on Rogers Sportsnet (national) and RIS Info Sports (live)
Daily Highlights
– 1:30 p.m. ET on RDS
– 3:30 p.m. ET on TSN

Friday, March 19

Daily Highlights
– 1:30 p.m. ET on RDS
– 3:30 p.m. ET on TSN

Saturday, March 20

Sledge Hockey Gold Medal Game
– 3 p.m. ET on CTV and RIS Info Sports (live)
– 12 midnight ET on RDS

Daily Highlights
– 1:30 p.m. ET on Rogers Sportsnet Ontario/West/Pacific and RDS
– 7 p.m. ET on Rogers Sportsnet East

Sunday, March 21

Daily Highlights
– 4 p.m. ET on CTV
– 11 p.m. ET on RDS

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Comments

12 Responses to “Paralympic Winter Games TV Schedule announced”
  1. Ross M says:

    I dont think it is fair that the paralympic games are not getting as much television precense as the olympics games did. The special athletes have dedicated just as much time and as much of their lives as the athletes in the olympics have. Just because the athletes are disabled does not mean their television presence should be denied. We have canadian athletes on tv and we cannot even watch them and show our proud support. The sledge hockey and some of the biathalon is all I have seen on television so far, with a quick glimpse of curling which was quickly turned to a regular sitcom program halfway through the match at the top of the hour. I find that the paralympic sports are equally as interesting and slightly more impressive to watch because of how much harder the athletes have worked to get where they are, and how much more skill is required to compete in their events with the handicaps they have. GO CANADA and lets try and support our paralympic athletes even if we can’t watch them on tv. The olympics are not over yet, lets stay proud and keep the olympic spirit alive until the flame is extinguished. Watch what you can when you can, tickets are available still and relatively affordable, lets show some support Canada, even if our television networks don’t feel the same!