Programmable thermostat, keep same temp? or adjust temp setting night/day? - Canadian TV, Computing and Home Theatre Forums
 

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Old 2008-11-11, 06:23 PM   #1
BobyYoo
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Default Programmable thermostat, keep same temp? or adjust temp setting night/day?

I was wondering is it really worth it to program your thermostat?

I'm using a heating oil furnace.
I have a programmable thermostat, and i used 4 different setting, between 5am-9am 22degree, 9am-4pm 21degree, 4pm-10pm 22degree, 10pm-5am 21degree.

My friend said it is just better to keep it at 22degree, because the furnace will start often and therefore the furnace is still warn everytime and use little heating oil.

He said, if i program it like that. Then, the furnace will not work for a long time and it will use more heating oil to heat up from the beginning.

what do think? I dont see much difference with programmable thermostat, the bill seem to be the same as to keep it same temp setting.
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Old 2008-11-11, 06:33 PM   #2
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MY experience is that you'll save money by doing a set back when you don't need heat. Shorter cycles will not give you as much efficiency, your furnace is going to be more efficient when it's running at it's peak operating temperature. I will argue till i'm blue in the face that not having to heat your house all day or part of the night isn't going to use less fuel than maintaining a constant temperature 24 hours a day.

When I installed and programmed our stat I also installed a new gas BBQ, we cook a majority of meals on it year round, with the stat on setback operation in the day and nights we still used less gas a year now even with the BBQ being used most of the time.

Ask your friend what he's basing his statement on.
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Old 2008-11-11, 06:37 PM   #3
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It always saves to set back. Same reason you dont leave your car running at idle while your at work...


http://apps1.eere.energy.gov/consume.../mytopic=12720

neat little calculator:

http://www.warmair.net/html/thermostats.htm
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Old 2008-11-11, 06:43 PM   #4
BobyYoo
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yeah i understand, normally i should save money using a programmable thermostat.

but in my case, the hours between each cycle is only few hours.

my furnace take a long time to heat up from zero and it seem to use a lot of oil.

that's why my friend said that either you dont save, or you save very little.
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Old 2008-11-11, 07:58 PM   #5
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Heat loss is directly proportional to the temperature differential between indoors and outdoors.

Your furnace has to replace the heat that's lost at any given time. Reducing the delta-t a few hours per day effectively reduces heat loss.

Yes, the heat lost during the setback period must be replaced during recovery; however, the loss in question is less than what the house would have lost had it been at a higher temperature.

A one degree setback isn't going to save anything; try three to four degrees.

CMHC did a study which confirms that programmable t-stats save energy when used on fossil fuel fired heating systems: https://www03.cmhc-schl.gc.ca/b2c/b2...00450000000009
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Old 2008-11-11, 08:10 PM   #6
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Yes, program it to be cooler at night, and during the day. Warm up in the morning and after work.

22? Wow! That's warm. 18 is nice and cozy for us. Oil heat, as well.
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Old 2008-11-11, 09:06 PM   #7
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i feel your pain oil users. I dumped a 5year old oil furnace the year gas came down my road. I was at 1600$ a year then.... dropped to 900$ for gas heat,water and BBQ,

As Thermostatic eXpansion Valve points out you have to drop 3-4-5degrees to get any benefits....
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Old 2008-11-11, 09:26 PM   #8
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I was going to say something similar. I'm not going to argue whether 22 is too hot or not, but a difference of just 1 degree isn't really worth it, is it?
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Old 2008-11-11, 09:41 PM   #9
BobyYoo
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well, i live in a duplex that has 2 floor and 1 basement.
the furnace heat up the whole house with only 1 thermostat.

I set the thermostat at 22degree but it is not 22 in every room.
If i put lower than 21, it is too cold. The people on the basement will complain.

So I cannot do much, if i switch between 21 and 24, then when it is at 24 i'll be spending more $$$.

Last year, when oil price was over $1/litre i spend over $1000 per month for the whole house, so divide by 3, it is about $350 each floor per month. Multiply by 5month of winter. Thats about $1500 per year
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Old 2008-11-12, 12:04 AM   #10
txv
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You can still reduce the temp for sleeping. (If it's okay with whoever's living in the basement)

If not a programmable t-stat is not for you; set it at 21 and be done with it.
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Old 2008-11-12, 09:15 AM   #11
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I would also suggest selective opening/closing of vents to balance the temperatures between floors. By closing some of your vents on the first floor, and making sure the basement vents are open, you can likely lower your temperature setting while keeping everyone happy and warm.
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Old 2008-11-12, 09:20 AM   #12
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You could also supplement heat in the cooler areas with electric baseboard heating or an electric fireplace.
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Old 2008-11-12, 12:52 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BobyYoo View Post
I dont see much difference with programmable thermostat, the bill seem to be the same as to keep it same temp setting.
It's pretty difficult to get an accurate before/after comparison since there are so many external influences, but as others have said, all of the studies indicate that you will save if you set the temperature back a few degrees overnight.

If somebody happens to leave a window or door open for a few hours you can easily burn a few extra litres of oil compensating; sometimes an external event like that is enough to screw up your comparison. You also can't go by your heating oil bill since the price of oil changes from delivery to delivery; at least it always did for me in the Ottawa area. If you have a fixed price for the season then you'd be OK, but you're better off looking at the actual consumption rather than the cost.

I've been tracking my energy usage since we moved into our current house 8 years ago. The best I've been able to do in terms of evaluating my usage is to track the litres consumed against the "heating degree days". HDD is a measure of how much you need to heat your house due to the weather, so tracking your usage relative to the HDD more or less takes the weather out of the equation, so you can meaningfully compare results from a very cold winter to a very mild winter. You can get HDD data for your region from Environment Canada. Use the "daily data" to see the HDD value for a given day, or simply get the bulk data for the whole year for your closest city.

If you keep your oil bills, you can look at the number of litres between fill ups and the number of days. If you went 15 days between fills and burned 500l in that time, add up the HDD values for those same 15 days. If those 15 days totalled 600 HDD, then you were burning 0.83 l / HDD. Even if you don't have your oil bills filed away, your heating oil company should be able to give you that info - they do the same calculations in order to know when you're going to need a fill-up. They could probably give you the numbers for the last 12 months, so if you start setting back the temperature and tracking the usage you'd be able to see if you're doing any better.

If you track those numbers over time you should see that your litres/HDD consumption stays relatively stable. Having other oil appliances like a water heater will throw the value off a bit since you'll tend to use the same amount of oil for water heating regardless of the weather. You might have to subtract a couple of litres per day for water heating to avoid the skew - your summer oil consumption would give you a rough idea in that case.

In our house with about 6000 sq ft. of living space we were burning around 0.9 litres / HDD. We switched over to natural gas this summer so it will be interesting to see how our gas consumption compares. The NG furnace is a high efficiency model (Carrier Infinity) so we're quite a bit better off right there. The biggest problem will be that I have everything on NG now rather than an oil/propane split. I'll have to compare my NG usage against the combined oil/propane usage of past years to see if my consumption is actually down.
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Old 2008-11-20, 09:31 AM   #14
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Regarding temp differentials in different areas of your house, I like to leave my furnace fan on all the time. I find it evens out the temp in the whole house, reduces condensation, increases filtration, ect.

I definately agree that only lowering 1 degree between time block whon't save much. I drop to 16*C at night and 21*C when home in the evenings and mornings.
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Old 2010-12-07, 11:16 AM   #15
bunny
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Yea, if your looking for wiring the thermostat properly, then here is the connections.
Red Wire > RC (Jumped to RH)
Yellow Wire > Y
Green Wire > G
White Wire > W
Orange Wire > O
Blue Wire > B
There are also a brown wire and a black wire not used coming out of the wall.

The new honeywell has the following connections:

Conventional --- HP
C --- C
G --- G
Y --- Y
W --- O/B
RC (jumped to R) --- RC (jumped to R)
R --- R
W2 --- AUX
Y2 --- E
--- L
Thank You,
Bunny
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