VBR HD MPEG-2 Encoding Competitve with H.264 - Canadian TV, Computing and Home Theatre Forums
 

Go Back   Canadian TV, Computing and Home Theatre Forums > Entertainment > What's On Blu-ray, DVD and in the theatres.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes

Old 2005-12-22, 12:56 PM   #1
DVDguy
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 332
Default VBR HD MPEG-2 Encoding Competitve with H.264

http://press.xtvworld.com/article8427.html

VBR HD MPEG-2 Encoding Competitve with H.264
Posted on Thursday, December 22 @ 10:40:00 CST by xtv
Technology Streaming Video Server Disc

Digigami announced its new MegaPEG HD MPEG-2 VBR encoder is capable of matching and, in some cases, exceeding the picture quality while offering reduced bitrates compared to current H.264 encoders.

Long Beach, CA, USA, December 22, 2005 -- Recently, Sony Pictures senior VP of advanced technologies, Don Ecklund, was blasted for his assertions about MPEG-2 video quality in defense of Sony's decision to release HD MPEG-2 encoded feature films on Blu-Ray discs. Digigami's own research and actual MPEG encoder output (sample movies available at http://www.digigami.com/megapeg/hdtv_samples.php) verify Ecklund's claims that MPEG-2 can and will continue to achieve quality/bitrates comparable to H.264 for the next generation of optical disc formats, including Blu-Ray and HD-DVD.

New Advances in MPEG-2 VBR Encoding squeeze Hi-Def MPEG-2 on standard DVD

Proponents claim H.264 is capable of HD encoding feature films at the same bitrates as standard definition DVD. To the extent that this is true, the capability is not unique to H.264. The new Digigami HD encoder can produce 720p content with an average bitrate of 3-7 mbit/s, which is equivalent to the bitrates used in today's standard definition DVD titles. Comparing with H.264 we can see there is no advantage; an improved MPEG-2 encoder can perform this feat well. Score one for MPEG-2.

"In our tests here at Digigami, we find that our MPEG-2 encoder is actually outperforming H.264 by a wide margin on 720p/1080p film content. Typically, our HD MPEG-2 encoder can produce VBR files two thirds to one half the bitrate produced by current H.264 encoders. On our website we have compressed material which supports this assertion. A recent example is a 400MB H.264 720p video blog that we recompressed to 172MB MPEG-1 VBR. In our testing, only highly saturated, brightly colored material (atypical of most content) is improved by H.264 - owing primarily to the use of 4:2:2 color."

Improves Widely Used MPEG-2 Rather Than Hopping H.264 Bandwagon

Digigami took a different approach to improving their video encoder technology. Firstly, the company built a powerful analysis tool (http://www.digigami.com/mpressionist/), which allows employees and customers to quantitatively analyze any existing compressed MPEG-2 footage. The results of different encoders, including H.264 encoders, can be compared quantitatively. Secondly, Digigami used these tools to analyze a large number of commercial DVD titles encoded by different encoders and mastering houses. Based on the findings, they made improvements to the company's core MPEG-2 encoder which eliminates inefficiencies of previous generation encoders - the same goal as H.264. However, these improvements require no changes to MPEG-2 HD televisions, which is the reason for having an ISO standard in the first place.

Pricing and Availability
The Digigami MegaPEG HDTV VBR MPEG-2 encoder is currently shipping and is available for Mac OS X, and runs on most modern Apple hardware. The price is $995.00, which includes everything you need for multi-pass interactive VBR encoding of feature film content. Digigami technical support provides assistance in achieving superior quality and file sizes with both HD and SD encoding.

About Digigami:
Digigami is a privately held company headquartered in the greater Los Angeles area. Digigami was founded in 1994 and released its first MPEG-1/MPEG-2 encoder, MegaPEG, in 1996 along with an early Netscape plug-in that plays streaming video in MPEG, AVI, QuickTime formats. For the past 10 years, Digigami has been continuously improving its MPEG video compression technology; MPressionist HDTV, MegaPEG HDTV and MoviesForMyPod are the most recent Digigami products.

For details and pricing information on all Digigami products, please visit our Web site at http://www.digigami.com/.
DVDguy is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 2005-12-22, 02:50 PM   #2
Jake
Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Gatineau and Ottawa
Posts: 10,854
Default

Quote:
A recent example is a 400MB H.264 720p video blog that we recompressed to 172MB MPEG-1 VBR
So now they are comparing MPEG-1 to H.264? What are they doing over there on their smoke breaks? MPEG-1 is limited to 4Mbps and 352x240. Am I missing something here folks?

And just like the first MP3 encoders, H.264 will most likely need some tweaking before they are ready for prime time.

Having said that I would like to see MPEG-2 and H.264 go head to head (with top of the line encoders) in an independent test.
__________________
Tip: See an offending post? Don't reply, report it by clicking on the 'Report Post' icon.
Jake is offline  
Old 2005-12-22, 03:54 PM   #3
Arthur Dent
Veteran
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Calgary
Posts: 2,771
Default

Amazing what things Sony would say in order not to pay VC1/H.264 royalties! And the things small software companies would do to stay in business with their outdated technology!
You can do 720p HDTV even at 3 Mbps with MPEG2 (if you hate those who will watch it ). But then again, there will be takers for anything. Just go and read how some people accept the garbage coming from Sirius and XM satellites (equivalent to low-quality internet stream 40kbps and less) as "acceptable" for music. Some even find it better than FM!
Arthur Dent is offline  
Old 2005-12-22, 04:02 PM   #4
adit
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Oakville,ON
Posts: 1,439
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Arthur Dent
Amazing what things Sony would say in order not to pay VC1/H.264 royalties!
Sony and everybody else must pay royalties for any BD player ( the player must supposrt the formats). I'm not sure how royalties goe to "per title", but I don't think they apply for every title anyway.
adit is offline  
Old 2005-12-22, 04:07 PM   #5
Arthur Dent
Veteran
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Calgary
Posts: 2,771
Default

I'm talking about the royalties that Sony owned studios will have to pay for using advanced codecs for their releases.
Arthur Dent is offline  
Old 2005-12-22, 04:37 PM   #6
adit
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Oakville,ON
Posts: 1,439
Default

I don't think it's big deal, a few cents per title.

http://www.mpegla.com/news/n_02-07-15_m4v.html

Plus Sony is part of the MPEG LA so part of royalties paid come back to them also.

Most likeley they do not have time at this moment to switch the software tools. Editing MPEG2 is MUCH easier than editing MPEG4 clips for example.
adit is offline  
Old 2005-12-27, 05:04 PM   #7
Digigami
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 2
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jake
So now they are comparing MPEG-1 to H.264? What are they doing over there on their smoke breaks? MPEG-1 is limited to 4Mbps and 352x240. Am I missing something here folks?
Incorrect. MPEG-1 specifies frame sizes up to 4000x4000 pixels and very high data rates. The primary reason MPEG-1 was amended/improved to MPEG-2 is for the coding of interlaced video. For feature film content at 24fps/progressive, MPEG-1 has everything needed except 2.2:1 anamorphic. It does have support for 16:9, so 2.2:1 is possible via 16:9 in combination with letterboxing.

Check out our MPEG-1 HD sample, "The Least Likely", available since June 05. Preferred viewer for PC/Mac users is the freely available VideoLAN client.

I live in California now, but I am Canadian born and educated, so this is a Canadian technology

- Gen Kiyooka
Digigami
Digigami is offline  
Old 2005-12-27, 10:11 PM   #8
Jake
Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Gatineau and Ottawa
Posts: 10,854
Default

Gen welcome aboard. Thanks for the feedback on our comments. What puzzles we is that anywhere you look on the internet you will find MPEG-1 specs top out at 352x240. Why is that? Are there different profiles and levels?
__________________
Tip: See an offending post? Don't reply, report it by clicking on the 'Report Post' icon.
Jake is offline  
Old 2005-12-29, 03:00 PM   #9
protovision
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Toronto, ON CA (bloor/jarvis)
Posts: 212
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jake
Gen welcome aboard. Thanks for the feedback on our comments. What puzzles we is that anywhere you look on the internet you will find MPEG-1 specs top out at 352x240. Why is that? Are there different profiles and levels?
I think thats the typical profile for a 'VCD' disk, but the format allows higher than that, as mentioned. A while back there was some talk of making SVCD disks, by using mpeg-2, and a higher rez, on a cd-r.

Its too bad that WMV-HD didn't take off, HD films on a DVD, hmm, sounds familar But then again, an MS/DRM format

protovision
protovision is offline  
Old 2006-01-04, 06:54 PM   #10
Digigami
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 2
Default MPEG-1 Specs

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jake
Gen welcome aboard. Thanks for the feedback on our comments. What puzzles we is that anywhere you look on the internet you will find MPEG-1 specs top out at 352x240. Why is that? Are there different profiles and levels?
In MPEG-1 there was a 'subset' called 'MPEG-1 constrained'. It is the closest thing to profiles/levels as used in MPEG-2 and MPEG-4, Part 10.

So the restrictions you are referring to indeed refer to MPEG-1 constrained.

PC, Mac and Linux decoders can play back almost any MPEG-1 file, as long as there is enough CPU juice - which, is most PCs dating back to the P3/600Mhz.

The DVD Spec also includes a restricted use of MPEG-1 352x240 up to 1.8 Mbits/s.

So, IMHO, for internet delivery of HD, MPEG-1 is tops. It has the largest installed base, lowest computational complexity for decoding and widest cross-platform support. Everyone supports it.

It's unfortunate that QuickTime does not allow for MP3 audio tracks in MPEG-1 files, because with a good MP3 encoder, MPEG-1 audio can give AAC a pretty good run for it's money.

Gen
Digigami is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:52 PM.

Search Digital Home

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.