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Old 2010-04-09, 12:26 PM   #76
cooper83
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Quote:
Same thin with the countries EYEran and EYEraq.
It drives me nuts when people misspell a word, only to create an entirely different word with a different meaning!
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Old 2010-04-09, 04:42 PM   #77
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wolla instead of voilà. I would accept voila as well.
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Old 2010-04-09, 05:31 PM   #78
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Using nonplussed to mean unnaturally calm when it actually means to be totally flabbergasted.
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Old 2010-04-10, 09:50 AM   #79
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"Very unique"
An object can be unique or not.

Another is more one of pronunciation. While accepted as a correct secondary pronunciation of arctic, I cringe when someone says "are-tik" rather than "ark-tik".
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Old 2010-04-10, 02:39 PM   #80
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Quote:
An object can be unique or not
That is what we have been told but it seems too "black or white". What about good? Can you be very good? I say yes and you can be very unique too.
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Old 2010-04-10, 02:49 PM   #81
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Quote:
"Very unique"
An object can be unique or not.
That's very true. ;-)
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Old 2010-04-11, 11:58 AM   #82
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My particular favourite:

nu-cu-lar (otherwise know as nu-cle-er to most people).

I think that George W Bush made this pronunciation popular although I hear the incorrect version more and more on TV.
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Old 2010-04-12, 10:16 AM   #83
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Jake is perhaps correct is so far as common usage but "unique" is a superlative.
For example, you can say "big" or "very big" and you can say "biggest", but it is grammatically incorrect to say "very biggest".

Unique literally means one of a kind. "existing as the only one or as the sole example".
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Old 2010-04-12, 12:27 PM   #84
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As long as we're talking about inappropriate use of adjectives...

So if I wanted the best object available, and someone else wants the very best object, does that mean that it's better than the best?

Last edited by TechieFreak; 2010-04-12 at 12:27 PM. Reason: fixed typo
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Old 2010-04-20, 12:48 AM   #85
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"aks" instead of "ask".
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Old 2010-04-20, 12:53 AM   #86
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Default Grammar/Spelling Pet Peeves

So as a continuation of the grammar thread, I am trying to create a paragraph-long short story that outlines the proper use of those words that irk us the most when used incorrectly.

Here's an example of a loooong sentence. (Yes, it's all I have so far.)

If they're going over there to get their two passports too, then they'll have a lot of waiting


You get the idea....

Anyone have any suggestions?
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Old 2010-04-20, 03:23 PM   #87
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Default Rules for Writers

Rules for Writers

1. Verbs HAS to agree with their subjects.
2. Prepositions are not words to end sentences with.
3. And don't start a sentence with a conjunction.
4. It is wrong to ever split an infinitive.
5. Avoid cliches like the plague. (They're old hat)
6. Also, always avoid annoying alliteration.
7. Be more or less specific.
8. Parenthetical remarks (however relevant) are (usually) unnecessary.
9. Also too, never, ever use repetitive redundancies.
10. No sentence fragments.
11. Contractions aren't necessary and shouldn't be used.
12. Foreign words and phrases are not apropos.
13. Do not be redundant; do not use more words than necessary; it's highly superfluous.
14. One should NEVER generalize.
15. Comparisons are as bad as cliches.
16. Don't use no double negatives.
17. Eschew ampersands & abbreviations, etc.
18. One-word sentences? Eliminate.
19. Analogies in writing are like feathers on a snake.
20. The passive voice is to be ignored.
21. Eliminate commas, that are, not necessary. Parenthetical words however should be enclosed in commas.
22. Never use a big word when a diminutive one would suffice.
23. Kill all exclamation points!!!
24. Use words correctly, irregardless of how others use them.
25. Understatement is always the absolute best way to put forth earth shaking ideas.
26. Use the apostrophe in it's proper place and omit it when its not needed.
27. Eliminate quotations. As Ralph Waldo Emerson said, "I hate quotations. Tell me what you know."
28. If you've heard it once, you've heard it a thousand times: Resist hyperbole; not one writer in a million can use it correctly.
29. Puns are for children, not groan readers.
30. Go around the barn at high noon to avoid colloquialisms.
31. Even IF a mixed metaphor sings, it should be derailed.
32. Who needs rhetorical questions?
33. Exaggeration is a billion times worse than understatement.

And finally...

34. Proofread carefully to see if you any words out.
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Old 2010-04-22, 02:59 AM   #88
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I was about to take issue with the first rule, but then realized that each point contradicted itself.

Good one!
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Old 2010-04-23, 09:05 PM   #89
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I guarantee that all of you, if not many of you, make this error all the time:

1990s vs 1990's (or 1980s, 2000s, etc.)

It annoys the hell out of me.
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Old 2010-04-23, 11:00 PM   #90
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Just wondering which one is correct in that regard, or if it can go both ways.

For example, "#1 Hits of the 80s" or "80's #1 Hits." (Which one would be correct in this comparison?)

Edit: Hmm, looking at it, it seems my first example would apply to hits from all of the years between '80 and '89, while the second one would just be for 1980.
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