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Old 2012-05-08, 02:20 AM   #1
staeit
 
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Default Wake on Lan over Internet w/ Actiontec V1000h

Hi all,

I'm trying to get Wake on LAN to work from anywhere to my laptop which is plugged into my Telus Actiontec router via Ethernet.

The relevant info is:
- Wake on LAN works within my home network. My iPhone on Wifi can turn my laptop on from shutdown within my LAN. Thus I've set everything up from the laptop's side. The utility I used to send the magic packet was "Scany" for iOS.
- I used a Wake On LAN monitor utility and found that the requests my iPhone was sending were over UDP port 9. Monitoring port 9 on my laptop and sending the request from my iPhone over LAN (you don't specify a port when over LAN with Scany) showed the Magic packets being sent.
- I have attempted to forward port 9 UDP to 192.168.1.255, the broadcast address. I then sent a WoL request from my iPhone (Scany) to my external IP, port 9. My intention was to send it to my IP, and then with that port forwarded to the broadcast address, for it to detect my MAC address and turn the computer on. It isn't seeing the packet, clearly.
- I also tried adding an arp entry of 192.168.1.10 FF:FF:FF:FF:FF:FF by telnetting into the router (yes I am able to Telnet). Then I removed the port 9 UDP port forwarding for 192.168.1.255 and replaced it with forwarding to 192.168.1.10.
- Still doesn't work. I've tried other WoL utilities on Windows and have the same result - can do it from LAN, but can't do it from outside my LAN.

Has anybody gotten this to work?
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Old 2012-05-08, 07:32 AM   #2
JamesK
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Wake on LAN relies on sending a "magic packet" to the MAC, not IP address. Since MAC addresses do not pass through a router, WoL will never work when you are not on the same network. It is possible to have a proxy receive the UDP packet and then convert it to a local broadcast, as described here.
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Old 2012-05-09, 08:46 AM   #3
staeit
 
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I used that link you gave me as a guide initially - if you'd read my post fully you would have seen that I had done what was advised in the guide.

Forwarded port 9 UDP to an address not used on my LAN (192.168.1.10), and then added an ARP entry for that same address with the MAC FF:FF:FF:FF:FF:FF. Still unable to get WoL over the internet, and I know it's possible since another guy on a different forum was able to get it working with this firmware version.

If you can, please help based on what I've written rather than just generically replying to how WoL works. Thanks.

EDIT: (really not trying to be rude, but specific answers are way more useful than generic ones)
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Old 2012-05-09, 11:06 AM   #4
JamesK
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Install Wireshark and use it to see what's happening. Also, that article said to use a dummy address with a MAC of FF:FF:FF:FF:FF:FF. It also said you can't forward to broadcast addresses. Changing the arp entry for your computer (I assume it's 192.168.1.10) to FF:FF:FF:FF:FF:FF will cause problems, as all devices are supposed to respond to it.

It is the MAC address that makes all this work. A NIC is supposed to respond only to it's own MAC and to the broadcast MAC. While WoL uses UDP, the computer involved has no way to use any portion of the IP stack. You can use Wireshark to watch for specific MAC addresses or UDP. A packet sent to the broadcast MAC, no matter what IP address it contains should be visible on all switch ports, so you can use another computer to run Wireshark. You can also run it on the laptop to see if the magic packets are making it that far. Until we know what's happening "on the wire", it's hard to guess.
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Old 2012-05-09, 03:11 PM   #5
staeit
 
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Quote:
Install Wireshark and use it to see what's happening. Also, that article said to use a dummy address with a MAC of FF:FF:FF:FF:FF:FF. It also said you can't forward to broadcast addresses. Changing the arp entry for your computer (I assume it's 192.168.1.10) to FF:FF:FF:FF:FF:FF will cause problems, as all devices are supposed to respond to it.

It is the MAC address that makes all this work. A NIC is supposed to respond only to it's own MAC and to the broadcast MAC. While WoL uses UDP, the computer involved has no way to use any portion of the IP stack. You can use Wireshark to watch for specific MAC addresses or UDP. A packet sent to the broadcast MAC, no matter what IP address it contains should be visible on all switch ports, so you can use another computer to run Wireshark. You can also run it on the laptop to see if the magic packets are making it that far. Until we know what's happening "on the wire", it's hard to guess.
Thanks for your followup response. To clarify a few things:
I didn't change the ARP entry for my computer - I changed it by telnetting to the router. My understanding was that because the broadcast address (192.168.1.255) doesn't function correctly, then by adding an ARP entry with FF:FF:FF:FF:FF:FF to another IP address (not in use by anything else) you are making THAT a broadcast address and then port forwarding UDP port to that address should allow it to come through to the router, and be broadcast and so if the MAC is found it will turn on. I haven't got any familiarity with Wireshark so not really sure what I'm looking for. I used a WoL monitor to monitor port 9 UDP, which saw a magic packet when I tried on my LAN, but doesn't see anything when I try over the internet.
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Old 2012-05-09, 04:05 PM   #6
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Wireshark is a very useful tool for resolving network problems. You can display what the NIC is sending and receiving and you can filter on a variety of parameters, so that you can watch for specific packets. You could, for example, see if that packet is even reaching your local network and, if so, if it contains what you're expecting.

Here are a few capture filters that may be useful.

udp - shows only UDP traffic
host 192.168.1.10 - IP traffic for specified IP address
ether host 00:08:15:00:08:15 - traffic for specified MAC address

These 3 filters should go a long way to help you see what you're looking for. Just change the IP & MAC addresses as appropriate.

You can find some Wireshark docs here and some more info here.
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