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Old 2012-02-07, 08:48 PM   #1
TechieFreak
 
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Default Pet Peeve - English grammar.

OK, I see it in forum threads all over, including this one.

1. Then - than. These two words are NOT interchangeable.
For example: This TV is bigger than that one. If this TV is cheaper, then I would buy this one.

2. Two - too - to. These words are also tossed all over like a drunk on a sinking Italian cruise ship. (too soon?)
For example: I would go to the store, but I am too tired. Also, I only have two dollars.

Please be careful with the primary language of this forum. It prevents confusion when reading the posts. Do not count on spell checkers, they only correct the spelling of the single word, not how it is being used to make a sentence.

If, once you've posted, you see that you've made a mistake, you can go back and edit the post. I know that we live in a world of instant messaging, where acronyms are used in place of full words. But in forums, you can take the time to write in your posts.

Please feel free to use punctuation or else sentences would tend to run on forever causing even more confusion and losing the opportunity to convey an important message and making the reader lose a key point that you are trying to make. (Yes, this last paragraph is missing punctuations, on purpose.)
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Old 2012-02-07, 09:49 PM   #2
jvincent
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Don't youse get me started.

I'm usually pretty anal about that kind of thing but find that I often miss some because the spell checker isn't a very good grammar/homonym checker.
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Old 2012-02-07, 09:58 PM   #3
Jake
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Make sure you read this post first to avoid further (not farther) duplication.

http://www.digitalhome.ca/forum/showthread.php?t=123191
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Old 2012-02-07, 10:17 PM   #4
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Guy's don't forget that English is not the only thing on earth, I know I have bad grammar but I ussaly get my self understood.

I'm french I'm not saying I write good in french because I don't, but lots here are french or other so maybe why are Grammar is not the best.


writing skills are not my forte but I'm a great auto mechanic
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Old 2012-02-07, 10:30 PM   #5
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alls i want is my too front teeth.
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Old 2012-02-07, 10:32 PM   #6
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Bad grammar, poor spelling, run on sentences and the lack of use of paragraphs make posts hard to read. In fact the web is so full of poor spelling I am starting to find myself doing a double-take on words that are spelled right.
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Old 2012-02-07, 10:48 PM   #7
DSgamby
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Ralph Wiggum Fails English
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8iSD9lPVY6Q
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Old 2012-02-19, 11:36 AM   #8
Jake
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I love these examples.

I have a friend who likes to debate my spelling or pronunciation. If you are reading this dear friend please take no offence.

Expresso: Versus the standard espresso spelling.
http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/expresso

Height: \ˈhīt, ÷ˈhītth\
When ending it with the second pronunciation or "th" sound.
http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/height
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Old 2012-02-20, 09:07 PM   #9
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Talking Alrighty then!

I like to intentionally use incorrect words and grammar in my daily life, just to see if anybody has the nerve or knowledge to bother correcting me.

Celine Dion likes to move her own furnitures.

I hate it when peoples interrupt me.

---------------------

[A boy falls off his skateboard]

Girl: Are you all right?

Boy: No. I'm half left.

http://www.dailywritingtips.com/is-alright-all-right/

Quote:
Scholars and grammarians are constantly debating the question of alright vs. all right. In common usage, all right is a synonym for okay or satisfactory, as in “Are you all right?” However, it can also mean “all correct”, as in, “My answers on the test were all right.”

Generally, most editors and teachers don’t think “alright” is all right. If you’re in doubt, it’s best to stick with the more widely accepted two-word “all right,” especially in formal academic or professional writing.
Imdb lists the Ace Ventura catchphrase (catch phrase) as "All righty then!"

Wikiquotes lists it as "Alrighty then!"

There is a movie called The Kids Are All Right (2010) and one called The Kids Are Alright (1979).

I prefer to type the word alright, even though it looks wrong.

I'm a lazyboy ... I mean lazy boy, of coarse ... ummm, of course.

http://grammar.quickanddirtytips.com...s-alright.aspx
[My grammar is always right, or is it?]

Quote:
And the American Heritage Guide to Contemporary Usage and Style seems to contradict itself. It states that “alright” as one word “has never been accepted as standard” but it then goes on to explain that “all right” as two words and “alright” as one word have two distinct meanings.

It gives the example of the sentence “The figures are all right.” When you use “all right” as two words, the sentence means “the figures are all accurate.”

When you write “The figures are alright,” with “alright” as one word, this source explains that the sentence means “the figures are satisfactory.” I’m not sure what to make of this contradiction. The many other grammar sources I checked, including a large dictionary, reject “alright” as one word.
------------------

I also like using [brackets], (parentheses), {braces}, and several hyphens to remind me that I'm going off topic or just being silly. It makes the paragraphs virtually unreadable (especially when I add run-on sentences to the mix), but it allows me to bury things (I like to wear pink underwear) that I don't want the average reader to pay attention to, or to even comment on.

----------------

To whom it may concern: I will never know who's on first, or whose shoes I would rather walk a mile in. To often avoid the problem of using who or whom in a sentence, I prefer to use the word that, whenever I think I can get away with it.

And knowing the difference between whether you implied or inferred something is also often beyond my comprehension.

---------------

I also hate it when hockey announcers mention that the puck would have WENT into the net ... instead of the correct way: have GONE.

I watched a lot of hockey as a teenager, and I would often say things like: "I should have WENT to school that day," without anybody correcting me. Eventually, my mother heard me utter that grammar blasphemy and let me know that I should have GONE to school more often, so that my sentences would make more sense.

Thanks, Mom.
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