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Thread: Pros and Cons of Going OTA Reply to Thread
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  Topic Review (Newest First)
2015-09-06 10:30 PM
jsebean
Quote:
Originally Posted by ExDilbert View Post
Some Global repeaters use Shaw Direct feeds as well. (Shaw own Global so it's a cheap and dirty option for them.) We are on the outside edge of two grade B contour Global signals here. The one that uses a Shaw Direct feed has noticeably lower picture quality.
When I had a chance to have a few words with an engineer at CIHF he said our repeater in my area get it's feed from Eastlink (our cable company here in NS). I'm not sure if that meant they had a cable box feeding it like every other Eastlink cable customer or if it's fibre feed, but that's what he said.
2015-06-26 04:05 PM
Wheelman
Quote:
Originally Posted by Airbalancer View Post
On a clear day I can get 50 between Toronto, Rochester and Buffalo with two antennas
How many unique channels can you get?
2015-06-26 11:56 AM
ExDilbert
Quote:
On a clear day I can get 50
In my books, that really doen't cut it for OTA. Stations need to be reliable in most weather conditions. It's those overly hot, cold, cloudy, rainy or snowy nights when OTA is most needed.
2015-06-25 11:31 PM
cbandsat I would combine an OTA antenna with a C-band satellite dish. Both are free and in most cases you will receive hundreds of quality channels (almost all in HD). For those who also want to subscribe to the odd premium channel, you can do so with a c-band subscription service.
2015-06-25 10:32 PM
Airbalancer
Quote:
Originally Posted by JamesK View Post
^^^^
Where are you that you can find 50 channels OTA?
On a clear day I can get 50 between Toronto, Rochester and Buffalo with two antennas
2015-06-25 05:15 PM
ExDilbert
Quote:
Why would anyone actually spend on the cheapest basic TV plan, between 30-40 tax in.
Because they live where there are almost no channels available OTA. There are lots of areas in Canada like that. Even some major cities in Canada only have a few channels. We get nine channels here, 5 local, one LOS nearby, one 1-edge and two on a 2-edge contour. Three of those are multicultural or religious. Even with an outdoor antenna, a the 2-edge channels are not reliable in some weather conditions. That leaves four, two of which I rarely watch.
2015-06-25 05:03 PM
JamesK ^^^^
Where are you that you can find 50 channels OTA?
2015-06-25 12:53 AM
hieppo Just got a total of 50 channels (HD and SD). Pretty good for free TV. Why would anyone actually spend on the cheapest basic TV plan, between 30-40 tax in. I still don't understand the current TV plan subscribers to shell out money for basic channels when it is all free with a little work or upfront installation from a professional installer. The amount I spent is around under $200 (antenna, preamp, dist. amp, HD 8' fence post and chimney stand-off). The rest is all elbow grease. If you had a professional installer, they may charge $200 max to climb the roof and install it on the chimney (height is a must).
So the total cost if paying someone to install it would be less than one year of basic TV plan. After that, it is free from there on.

BTW, you do not need a separate TV box for each TV. All modern flat panel TV comes with ATSC tuner ready. You just plug in the RG6 signal from the antenna right into the TV and scan for channels.

I been doing this almost 10 years now. First two years was with rabbit ears and cheap clones antenna (waste of money but a lesson well learned). I have never looked back on the switch. So basically, I had free TV for about 9 years.
2015-05-17 02:53 PM
ExDilbert The CBC shut down all their repeaters so all that's left are originating stations. Though it's not guaranteed, I would hope they use high quality, high bandwidth feeds for originating stations.
2015-05-17 01:15 PM
roger1818
Quote:
Originally Posted by ExDilbert View Post
Remote repeaters sometimes use satellite signals as feeds. That means we still get lousy picture quality on some channels with extra problems like more station down time, lack of PSIP data and added artifacts from the extra processing.
This is partially true and depends on the type of satellite feed. Sometimes it is a high bandwidth satellite feed and provides an excellent picture quality. CBC for example uses satellite for their network feed that the BDUs also use (though they have other issues since they are down-converting a 1080i source to 720p for distribution).

The worst is when they use a BDU's satellite feed as you are then limited by their picture quality.
2015-05-15 09:01 PM
stampeder A discussion purely about Internet pricing was completely off topic for the OTA Forum so has been deleted.
2015-05-12 10:09 PM
bev fan Pros:
Ability to watch some sub channels in SD quality and close to 20 broadcast channels ( depending on location and the set up) in 720p or 1080i HD, basically free of charge.

Cons:
No live news, sports and specialty channels that makes Pros irrelevant to people like myself.
2015-05-12 08:54 PM
majortom In the US most of the Cable specialty channels and major network broadcasts, originate from CBAND satellite, in a high bitrate unmolested form.
An individual cannot subscribe to these unmolested feeds any longer, so there really is no point in maintaining a list.
2015-05-12 11:01 AM
ExDilbert Some Global repeaters use Shaw Direct feeds as well. (Shaw own Global so it's a cheap and dirty option for them.) We are on the outside edge of two grade B contour Global signals here. The one that uses a Shaw Direct feed has noticeably lower picture quality.
2015-05-11 06:23 PM
Jase88 The forum doesn't maintain information on the feed type for each transmitter. This information may be found if you search a specific station's licensing submissions on the CRTC's broadcast website.

I do have some concerns with regards to the term "remote satellite feed".

Most (if not all) of the major broadcast networks do use c-band satellite feeds which have exceptional quality and are resistant to rain fade and other issues. I think what ExDilbert is referring to are transmitters which use signals from direct broadcast satellites, which present a level of quality intended for consumers.

For example, CHCH's repeaters utilize Shaw satellite TV service for their repeaters.
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