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Thread: TO Mayor Wants Yellow Ribbons Off City Vehicles Reply to Thread
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  Topic Review (Newest First)
2007-06-21 08:03 PM
otown47 Whats nice about Canada is that its a free country and people can support whomever they choose in whatever way they want. Also, because we are democracy, our government is accountable to us and will therefore act according to the will of the people...in this case this means yellow ribbons on city vehicles.

God Bless Canada !!!!
2007-06-21 06:01 PM
Mole Thirty years later, Viet Nam has "most favored nation" status with the US.



And of course is still run by dirty commies with no real sense of patriotism.
2007-06-21 02:17 PM
Mexicanuck
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quicksilver
Once again I have to ask does this ribbon signify support for the troops (noun) or the cause they are fighting for?
I think that is the basis for some of the debate. I believe that for some, displaying a ribbon is a personal statement of recognition of the dedication of individuals in the Canadian military. I appreciate that, although I don't understand why, if that is the case, we haven't seen this kind of behaviour for decades, or even in the few years before 2001 when Canadian troops were peacekeeping in many place in the world. I don't believe those people had less respect for Canadian military personnel before 2001.

I think that for others, the issue is as Nanuuk put it, "Its (sic) called patriotism." The "personal statement of recognition of the dedication of individuals" morphs into a kind of support for the country and its actions, i.e., the military activity in Afghanistan.

Displaying a ribbon then becomes seen by many to be a political statement of support for what they view as a misguided foreign policy and criticism of the ribbons becomes seen as an unpatriotic act.

The Afghanistan and Iraq efforts kind of remind me of the Korean "conflict" (because it apparently wasn't a war) in the 1950s and the war in Viet Nam in the 1960s. Western powers ostensibly engaged in support for the population of a foreign country, when the real motivation had to do with their own domestic interests. People who supported the actions were considered patriotic and those who criticized the actions were seen as unpatriotic. People who "supported the troops" by calling for them to be brought home, were seen as unpatriotic.

Of course, those two military actions ended in different ways. During the 1950s to be seen as unpatriotic was equated with being subversive. This wasn't so much the case in Canada, but in the States there was the environment of the McCarthy hearings and the House Committee on UnAmerican Activities.

"Patriotism" prevailed.

Fifty years later there are still thousands of foreign troops in Korea and North Korea is seen as being a "Great Satan".

During the 1960s, to be seen as unpatriotic was, in the US, also equated with being a "Commie". But as the years went by, increasing numbers of Americans lost belief in the political and military leadership.

Troops were withdrawn.

Thirty years later, Viet Nam has "most favored nation" status with the US.
2007-06-21 12:19 PM
Mexicanuck That was a poorly worded question.

"If you display the yellow ribbon are you supporting the war in Afghanistan?"

The results have little meaning as the question could be understood in at least two very different ways.

The first way would be, "If you are a person who displays the yellow ribbon are you supporting the war in Afghanistan?"

I think that the majority of people couldn't respond to that question because, based on the number or ribbons I see, the majority of people aren't displaying ribbons.

The second way would be, "If a person displays the yellow ribbon, is the person supporting the war in Afghanistan?"

This question is effectively not answerable. It would require the respondent to ascertain the minds of persons the respondent doesn't know.

Given that the question is unclear, and at least one of the possible interpretations of the question cannot be reliably answered, I think the results have no utility.

Who writes these questions? Apparently someone who didn't study research in university. (Or maybe they did and chose to write an ambiguous question.)
2007-06-21 08:29 AM
otown47 Here's the results of the Canada AM poll from yesterday on the subject

http://www.ctv.ca/servlet/ArticleNew...0927/20060927/
2007-06-21 08:22 AM
eljay
Quote:
Originally Posted by sleemo View Post
Why are you "surprised" to see me adding my voice to the mayor's? You don't know me. I don't think I've ever posted anything here saying I'm for or against this issue. So stop assuming.
I'm not "assuming" to know anything about you. This thread was started on the basis of an article discrediting the mayor for supporting the end of the ribbon campaign, so I'm surprised to see you using a vilified person to support your assertion that the ribbons mean support for the troops and nothing else.

Quote:
My "opinion" is the official position of the mayor's office. So it doesn't really matter because they say the ribbon is there to show support for our TROOPS.
This in no way diminishes the fact that some people believe the ribbon campaign is indirectly a show of support for the Afghan mission. The campaign began after the Aghan mission was under way, and no one relates this campaign with support for our troops in countries other than Afghanistan.

And, again, support for troops is neither increased nor diminished by the number of stickers adorning municipal vehicles. To equate no stickers with no support is incorrect. How many stickers promoting cancer research are on Toronto's municipal vehicles? Does Toronto not support cancer research?
2007-06-21 08:12 AM
sleemo Why are you "surprised" to see me adding my voice to the mayor's? You don't know me. I don't think I've ever posted anything here saying I'm for or against this issue. So stop assuming.

My "opinion" is the official position of the mayor's office. So it doesn't really matter because they say the ribbon is there to show support for our TROOPS.
2007-06-21 08:06 AM
QuickSilver Well If I read the words on the ribbon itself does it not literally say "Support Our Troops"?
2007-06-21 08:00 AM
eljay I'm surprised to see you adding the mayor's voice to yours, given that he's apparently evil for supporting the end of a ribbon campaign he neither started nor whose duration he determined.

Regardless, you + mayor is not a universal concensus, so your opinion that "the ribbon does symbolize support for our TROOPS. Thats it." remains an opinion, not a fact.
2007-06-21 07:55 AM
sleemo
Quote:
Originally Posted by eljay
In your opinion.
And our mayor's.
2007-06-21 07:50 AM
eljay In your opinion.

Evidently some people feel that because this ribbon campaign was implemented purportedly as a "show of support" for the troops in Afghanistan - and not as a show of support for all our troops, including those in the Balkans, in Africa and elsewhere - the campaign also represents a show of support for the Afghan mission.

I find very strange the perception that not having stickers on municipal vehicles somehow equates to a "lack of support" for something.
2007-06-21 07:43 AM
sleemo To answer your first question, yes, the ribbon does symbolize support for our TROOPS. Thats it.
2007-06-21 07:23 AM
QuickSilver Once again I have to ask does this ribbon signify support for the troops (noun) or the cause they are fighting for?

My Directors son is in Afghanistan currently and has a ribbon on her vehicle. Does that mean she supports the entire Afghan campaign or the fact that her son is in the military and risking his life?

This is an actual question not an opinion.
2007-06-21 12:50 AM
57
Quote:
it's just a ribbon.
This ribbon is on a government vehicle and whether I approve of what the ribbon says or not, I don't want our government vehicles plastered with "the latest cause" be it troops, gay rights, or whatever other ribbon there is available - I've seen so many ribbons in the US that they totally lose their value.

If you wish to put a ribbon on your personal vehicle, that's fine with me, however, keep "your" cause off government vehicles, which are paid for by all of us, whatever your cause may be. (This does not mean I don't support our troops)
2007-06-20 11:38 PM
mtlnorm "People can appreciate many things about the US or any other country without having to adopt the values or behaviours of that other country."

Again, what a complete crock.

Jeez, it's just a ribbon.

It is unbelievable how some of you can take a simple gesture of respect and turn it into a political cause.
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