: PC to TV viewing


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gloriousglenn
2011-05-01, 11:38 AM
Hi all,

I can view a TV station online and I would like to view it on my TV. The TV station does not play through Windows Media Player, it plays on an embedded player on the webpage.

My PC is currently connected to my TV via a Cat5 cable (via a router) but they are approximately 75-100 feet away from each other, and neither can be moved!

So basically what I am looking for is to be able to view my PC on my TV, as of it is a secondary monitor. Preferably through the Cat5 cable, but I am willing to change the cabling for a permanent change.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Glenn

DEV666
2011-05-01, 12:38 PM
If your TV supports DLNA streaming you could try Wild Media Server. It can transcode some online content to play on DLNA devices.

gloriousglenn
2011-05-01, 01:33 PM
It's a Samsung PN50C550G1F which does support DLNA. I will go an have a look to see how 'Wild Media Server' works and give it a try. Thanks.

Of course if there are other options I would love to hear them.

gloriousglenn
2011-05-01, 01:47 PM
Correction to my original post....I could do it with a 50ft cable. So would anybody suggest a HDMI (male to male) or HDMI to DVI Digital cable, or neither?!

pnear
2011-05-01, 04:14 PM
Actually, I'd suggest that PlayOn might be a better media server for you as it transcodes online video from various web sites (Hulu, tv.com, etc).

All of the media servers actually re-encode the video which takes a ton of horsepower on the PC and reduces the quality. You're better off connecting directly.

I've read some decent reviews of wireless HDMI bridges recently, including this one http://www.missingremote.com/review/brite-view-air-synchd-wireless-hdmi-bridge.

From searching a few of the usual cheaper places for HDMI, you're looking at close to $200 for a 50 ft HDMI cable. Or about $200 for an adapter that lets you connect HDMI-CAT5-HDMI (up to 200 feet).

gloriousglenn
2011-05-01, 06:29 PM
I think from reading what you guys have said and from my own minimal experience, connecting directly would be a preferred option as I know I can just select the relevant 'Source' on the TV and there it is, my PC screen showing on my TV (tried and tested on my laptop with an HDMI cable)!

But it's the distance I am 'worried' about.....I mean a 3ft HDMI cable from my laptop to my TV is one thing, 50ft to my main PC is another. There seems to be plenty of 50ft HMDI cables on newegg that are between $50-100 but I don't want to spend money on that to find out the quality is poor. I would rather spend $200 and get the right stuff the first time, be it whatever it is.

Why am I asking on here? Well first hand experience is a lot better than a review that may have been written by a manufacturer!

57
2011-05-01, 06:38 PM
Anything beyond 15' and I suggest a 22 ga HDMI cable, however, as soon as you go beyond 25' for some equipment (signal varies with equipment) a repeater may be required.

pnear
2011-05-01, 06:42 PM
With digital, it either works or it doesn't. There isn't any difference in picture quality between a cheap cable and an expensive one.

That said, cable manufacturing quality could have an impact on whether the signal gets to its destination or not. I suspect that reviews on reputable retail sites would tell you if there are any major issues. If there are issues, make sure they'll take a return of a defective product.

gloriousglenn
2011-05-01, 09:48 PM
So....22 gauge, 50 ft, check the return policy. If that doesn't work, try it with a splitter. If that doesn't work...Redevelop the house so that the PC is closer to the family room!!!

One last question (ya bored of me yet?!!)....Is there any difference really between:
50FT 22AWG CL2 Standard Speed HDMI Cable - Black
50FT 22AWG CL2 Silver Plated Standard Speed HDMI Cable - Black
50ft 22AWG CL2 Standard Speed w/ Ethernet HDMI Cable - Black

...apart from about $13?

e268
2011-05-01, 10:57 PM
Another solution is to use an older pc and hook it up to your tv. That is what I am doing. My old pc is a single core AMD running winxp/linux. But, you could probably pick up a new one for a few hundred bucks.

ScaryBob
2011-05-01, 10:57 PM
In theory, the silver plated cable should be better. Is that the wires or connectors that are plated? Silver is a better conductor than copper so it might provide a better signal. It also depends on the plugs at each end. If they are chrome, silver or gold connector plating will do no good. If they are gold plated, gold or silver plating on the connectors might provide a more reliable connection.

The HDMI+Ethernet is probably for devices that support Ethernet over HDMI. If both do, it might provide some advantage. If not, it's a waste of money.

moonzero
2011-05-02, 04:01 AM
As I understand your requirement like this;

pc hd video (internet video source) ===> network cables ===> HDTV.

IME, You have some basic options ;

1. If your walls allow to use wireless hdmi extender. but as I know their price range higher than $200

2. Second option is to use, hdmi over cat5 extender. (cat6 cables recommended, because if your source is hd you will have to carry high bandwith data overcables ), price are acceptible $30 - $200. You can check this site for tips and tricks : www.hdmiovercat5.net (http://www.hdmiovercat5.net)

3. You can use dvi extender over network or wireless - (only video can be transmitted). It might not be acceptable for your side.

4. DLNA protocol can be used, but it must be supported from your HDTV.

5. If your pc has component output, you will also have a chance to transmit hd signal upto 1080i.

57
2011-05-02, 10:55 AM
moonzero, some quick comments on your points.

3. Sometimes from a computer the DVI can carry audio as well if using a DVI to HDMI connection on the TV. The settings in the computer need to be correct and the hardware needs to support this. If both devices have HDMI, the settings need to be correct on the computer and the cable needs to allow the signal to pass over the 50' length.

5. Composite cables can only carry 480i. Perhaps you meant component video, which can carry up to 1080P, but is often limited to 1080i by the equipment (firmware), not the cable itself.

moonzero
2011-05-02, 01:32 PM
thank you 57, for your corrections.

You are right and updated my post.

Wayne
2011-05-02, 02:04 PM
The other issue you haven't mentioned is being able to control the signal from where your TV is because just running a cable and treating your TV like a second monitor - will you just be streaming a live signal or do you want to pause, ff, rew, etc? And the way you propose sending the video means that you will have to actually start the TV channel via the web browser on your PC and then maximize it in your "second" monitor and remember you will be doing all of this blind since you can't see your second monitor since it is 50 ft away (unless you are cloning the primary monitor of your PC).

You might just be better off buying a cheap PC and using that, especially if cables and baluns are going to cost a couple of hundred dollars. You can get a Dell Zino starting at $350. Add a USB based remote for a few bucks and you are in business and can do other stuff like Netflix, etc.

NolanGrayson
2011-05-02, 02:04 PM
I'm not saying this is "the" solution or even a cost effective one, but you can stream audio & video over cat5 with an Avocent EMS 1000MP media streamer or a similar product. I only know about them because I have these at my workplace. The ones we have even support IR blaster.

http://www.avocent.ca/products/ems/ems1000.asp

ScaryBob
2011-05-02, 04:19 PM
I see a DLNA server as the the best option (to replace the Windows Media Server.) The problem will be finding one that does everything required. I'm sure members here have some good recommendations.

Another option is to build an HTPC for use with the TV. There are a number of threads and recommendations on suitable builds. One of the new mini-ITX HTPC motherboard solutions in an ultra compact case might be affordable.

gloriousglenn
2011-05-02, 09:49 PM
I seem to change my mind every time I read this thread now! It's making me think about the options...But that is a good thing. I really do appreciate all of your replies and I'm now thinking about the Dell Zino type option.

Not only would it mean I don't have to worry about all of the cabling (I was also looking at wall plates etc too!), but it means I can double up the PC as my BD player too. Then, at a later date, I can add a surround sound amp/speaker system and I should be set!!

Many thanks guys.....and if there is any further input feel free to make my decision even harder!

Cheers
Glenn

adit
2011-05-03, 02:46 PM
Get a new laptop with one of SandyBridge supported WiDi CPUs. Get a Netgear PTV2000 adapters.Watch your laptop creen on your TV wirelesly.I know it's not your case but it's something to keep in mind if you are looking for a new laptop, anyway.I think there are also HDMI wireless adapters which work with any PC not only with Intel WiDi like this one:

http://www.brite-view.com/hdelight.php

JimmyFace
2011-05-11, 12:43 PM
I use a 50 foot hdmi from pc to projector with no quality issues, video only, but I would recommend media pc of some kind if you have to carry video and audio that far, everything else is a constant codec headache or streaming bandwidth issue. For me it should be full pc and not separate device for media. You will be glad you did it.