: 3D Plasmas and Blu-Ray coming in 2010


Pages : [1] 2 3 4 5

hoodlum
2009-08-26, 12:27 PM
This new technology will initially only be applied to plasmas due to how 120hz plasmas operate. The quality will be much better than the standard 3D glasses we are use to and will be in full 1080p.

http://www.hdguru.com/

Panasonic’s Executive Vice President Bob Perry provided the HD GURU with details about its 3D HDTVs and Blu-ray players. He revealed there will be “multiple 3D compatible plasma models” available in 2010 with the smallest at least 50″ diagonal. The Panasonic Blu-ray 3D player will be backwards compatible with 2D Blu-ray discs as well as DVDs. Panasonic will include all 3D processing within the Blu-ray player (as opposed to an external converter) and the signal will be delivered to the 3D plasma HDTV via a single HDMI 1.4 cable (white cable in photo of prototype Blu-ray 3D player). The 3D is “Full HD” (1920 x 1080) with left and right image frames alternating at 120 Hz. Perry explained plasma is an ideal TV technology for “Full” 3D HD as its rapid refresh permits the display of the highest quality 3D images. (Current 3D flat panels show no more than half HD resolution and will only display 3D content via a PC). Perry added he expects a three year industry transition to 3D compatible displays.




BD specs will be completed this year.

http://www.videobusiness.com/article/CA6685513.html?industryid=47275

The bulk of the BDA’s work on a Blu-ray 3D spec is expected to be completed this year, according to industry sources. By September, the engineering guidelines of the spec should be finalized. Licensing terms for the technology should be hammered out by the end of this year.

“We have every confidence that [studios] will announce products in 2010,” said one source.

Tezster
2009-08-26, 12:47 PM
This might make sense for people who have yet to upgrade to a HD display and/or BD media 2-3 years down the road, but I can't see people who have already shelled out big bucks for a brand spanking new flat panel display and BD player to do it all over again (oh, and a new HDMI 1.4 cable, of course) when this technology comes to the consumer market.

Paulo
2009-08-26, 02:13 PM
I agree Tezster,
I don't know about the rest of you but I can't see people running out to get a new 3D display anytime soon. Most people have just entered the "HD world" new flat pannel, Bd player, HD SAT/Cable boxes, etc..... This will just be a temporary thing!

Paul

dm_4u
2009-08-26, 02:31 PM
The thing is...most haven't entered the HD world as of yet.

Therefore there may be a huge market for this...if it arrives before the masses migrate to HD.

Also...the majority of people who have HD and BD right now...are early adopters...and regardless of what they/we own...we'll jump into the fire because it will be a "must-have" electronic device.

With that said...if it's a really cool thing...works really well...and isn't too outlandish in price...it could be the ultimate in Home Theatre.

Is there a pre-order list yet :cool:

reidw
2009-08-26, 06:35 PM
I've said it before and I'll continue to repeat that until 3D is possible without those silly glasses 3D will remain an oddity only. Technically it has become quite impressive for short programs/films but I could never sit through a two or three hour film/sports event with those glasses on my nose. There are also some issues that I think will hinder 3D success in the home:

1. Everyone who wants to watch in 3D will need a pair of glasses. How many pairs am I going to have to have "in stock" ? For some sports events I often have ten people in the my basement theatre. Am I going to have to have ten sets of these glasses ready to go? How many sets will come with the TV? How long will they last?
2. For hygenic reasons the glasses will need to be kept clean for each user. At the theatre this is done by theatre for you or they use disposables. At home it's going to be your responsibility to ensure that the glasses do not become a source of infection. I'll wager that most home users will find this a nuisance.
3. I wear glasses and so far none of the 3D glasses I've used at the theatre have been really very comfortable over top of my regular glasses. In one case by the way my regular glasses actually negated the 3D effect very noticeably.

Add to this list the anecdotal stories circulating about the bad headaches 3D viewing has caused some theatre goers and I have to say that 3D is just a gimmick or fad. It may have a little more staying power than it did in the 1950's but in the end it won't work without a significant technology change (i.e. no glasses required). Still, I'd be interested in what others think.

worth
2009-08-27, 11:27 AM
Also...the majority of people who have HD and BD right now...are early adopters...and regardless of what they/we own...we'll jump into the fire because it will be a "must-have" electronic device.

With that said...if it's a really cool thing...works really well...and isn't too outlandish in price...it could be the ultimate in Home Theatre.


Well, I'm an early adopter in most things, but I have absolutely zero interest in 3D.

I remember the first attempted 3D comeback in the early 80s, and honestly don't feel it's improved all that much. The recent 3D theatrical presentations that I've seen (Coraline, Up), looked dim and washed-out compared to standard 35mm or digital projection, and I can only imagine it looking worse on a small screen at home.

And according to this piece in the LA Times, it looks like the bloom may already be off the 3D rose:

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/entertainmentnewsbuzz/2009/07/3d-starting-to-look-flat-at-the-box-office.html

Ouser
2009-08-28, 08:06 PM
I have to agree- I am a huge tech addict- and have zero interest in 3d- until I can actually see Leia say "help me me Obi Wan Kenobi- you are my only hope" the way it was meant to be seen ;)

No way will I buy another tv, amp and bluray player to accommodate hdmi 1.4- not for a few years anyway!

HT gearhead
2009-08-28, 08:40 PM
I'll pass, 3D with glasses on is a novelty but not much else. But to watch hours on end with glasses on is out of the question.

hoodlum
2009-08-29, 11:19 PM
I found this interesting write-up on 3D. Here are some exerpts.

'Full 3D' vs 'Half-3D': is it all a headache? (http://www.rapidtvnews.com/index.php/200908274565/full-3d-vs-half-3d-is-it-all-a-headache.html)

3D on TV, in our view, is going to happen. Hollywood's studios are not simply fully backing 3D but looking to convert back-catalogue films to 3D, such is the financial appeal of cinema revenues and the all-important Blu-ray market. And by the way, it isn't easy to video a 3D movie from a cheap camcorder at the back of the theatre, and so another piracy option is curbed. Hollywood is also enjoying something of a creative renaissance as far as 3D is concerned. Output is no longer focused (if that's the word) on 'in your face' stunts and extravagant special effects, but in enhanced reality that emphasises the natural story line.

But the oldest advice in the entertainment industry is to 'follow the money', and Hollywood knows it has a winner in 3D. Dreamworks' 'Monsters vs Aliens' did well at the box office. Internationally just 18% of the screens delivered 44% of the revenue. They were all 3D. In North America 28% of the screens (all 3D) turned in 58% of the movie's overall revenue. Much the same figures and ratios apply to almost all the past year's releases. There are also a rapidly growing number of suitable screens for theatrical release. When 'Chicken Little' was released in 2006 it was shown on 3D on just 40 North American screens. 'Beowulf' was exhibited on 400 screens in 2007. 'Bolt' from Disney was exhibited on 1600 screens in mid-summer 2008, while Avatar last winter achieved 2200 3D screens. By 2013 Screen Digest forecasts that North America will have 8400 3D screens. Europe will top 7400, and the suggestion is that French, German and Italian local film studios will by then be wholly getting the 3D message. In other words it isn't just Hollywood that will influence our 3D entertainment.

Packaged console games are also embracing 3D. There have been extensive trials of 3D coverage of sports, and this coming winter's Vancouver Winter Olympic Games will see extensive 3D coverage (Beijing's coverage, while spectacular, was limited). London's 2012 Games is expected to have an even greater element of 3D programming.

At present, 3D content producers have to hand-build their own 3D production systems by physically connecting multiple 2D production devices. Panasonic, for example, is currently developing a professional Full HD 3D production system, which consists of a twin-lens P2 professional camera recorder and a 3D compatible High Definition Plasma display. The twin-lens P2 camera recorder enables the capturing of natural and high-quality live 3D images. One can expect the items to be on show, perhaps only in advanced prototype form, at IBC.

Khorn
2009-08-30, 08:53 AM
I'll pass on 3D and wait for true Holographic-imaging displays. I want to be able to walk amongst the prizes on The Price Is Right.

reidw
2009-08-30, 11:27 AM
Um Hoodlum, with regard to Avatar. Is this referring to James Cameron's new movie? It hasn't even been released yet and it has already "last winter achieved" (past tense) 2200 screens? Is the writer clairvoyant? That writer clearly is a shill for 3D. I agree with HT Gearhead. Most people could not watch hours and hours of 3D TV if they have to wear those glasses. As for popularity over the long haul. It may be a hit with techno-geeks (some anyway) but the general audience both in the theatre and the home has yet to be heard from.

hoodlum
2009-09-02, 10:12 AM
BDA officially announces support for 3D. Disney is on board as well based on their comments in this press release. Sony is expected to announced support for 3D on TVs, laptops and PS3 later today.

http://www.reuters.com/article/pressRelease/idUS32312+02-Sep-2009+BW20090902

The Blu-ray Disc Association (BDA) today announced its plans for incorporating
3D into the widely successful Blu-ray Disc format. The rapid and enthusiastic
consumer adoption of Blu-ray Disc, coupled with the format`s technical
capabilities and capacity make it the ideal format for bringing a vibrant 3D
experience to consumers.

"The BDA intends to take full advantage of the format`s high bandwidth and
capacity to achieve the very highest possible quality 3D experience," said
Victor Matsuda, Blu-ray Disc Association Global Promotions Committee Chair.
"Just as Blu-ray Disc has paved the way for next generation, high definition
home entertainment, it will also set the standard for 3D home viewing in the
future."

The BDA, comprised of major motion picture studio, IT and consumer electronics
companies, is working on a uniform specification to ensure consistent delivery
of 3D content across the Blu-ray Disc Platform. The Association is examining a
number of criteria and at a minimum, the specification will require delivery of
1080p resolution to each eye and backward compatibility for both discs and
players, meaning that 3D discs will also include a 2D version of the film that
can be viewed on existing 2D players and 3D players will enable consumers to
playback their existing libraries of 2D content.

"Consumer adoption of Blu-ray continues to grow at a very steady pace," said Bob
Chapek, President, Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment. "The 3D theatrical
market has been very successful this year. We are just now seeing all of the
true capabilities of 3D and with Blu-ray Disc`s superior technical
characteristics, as well as the broad industry support of the format, it makes
it the ideal packaged media platform for 3D home entertainment."

stampeder
2009-09-03, 06:09 PM
Sony plans to put 3D televisions in homes by the end of next year

By Maija Palmer
Published: September 2 2009 03:00 | Last updated: September 2 2009 03:00
Financial TImes

3D technology looks set to hit the home consumer market next year, with Sony today announcing plans to sell 3D televisions globally by the end of next year.

Sony's decision to throw its weight behind the technology will be an important boost for the 3D industry, which has so far focused mainly on cinemas. British Sky Broadcasting has said it would introduce a 3D satellite channel in the UK next year, but it had been unclear whether there would be equipment available with which to view it.http://www.ft.com/cms/s/093755da-9759-11de-83c5-00144feabdc0,Authorised=false.html?_i_location=http%3A%2F%2F www.ft.com%2Fcms%2Fs%2F0%2F093755da-9759-11de-83c5-00144feabdc0.html%3Fnclick_check%3D1&_i_referer=http%3A%2F%2Fslashdot.org%2F&nclick_check=1

stampeder
2009-09-03, 06:13 PM
Video link and more details here:

http://www.akihabaranews.com/en/news_details.php?id=18814

hoodlum
2009-09-04, 10:45 AM
LG is now on board as well.

http://www.geeks.co.uk/6685-lg-3d-hd-tv-with-pdp

So all the major TV players will have 3D TV by the end of next year (all using the shutter glasses). Panasonic, Samsung and LG are focusing on Plasma for 3D. It will be interesting to see how Sony implements 3D on LCD.

zyad
2009-09-04, 08:39 PM
Just a quick question. The glasses look tinted. Will this mean that a TV would have to be in a torch mode to see a pic bright enough? (brightness equivalent to watching regular content)

scotta
2009-09-09, 03:20 PM
Since the shutter glasses block each eye at least 50% of the time, your TV will have to be set brighter when using them for the same apparent viewing brightness without the glasses.

AmowAgou
2009-09-30, 09:47 AM
More information on 3D TV

http://www.panasonic.co.jp/corp/news/official.data/data.dir/en090928-4/en090928-4.html

reidw
2009-09-30, 10:04 AM
I assume these sets will still be capable of displaying non 3D images as well? What if you have more people than glasses in your viewing room? What would a person see without the glasses? Will broadcast 3D whether OTA, satellite or cable ever be possible?

The idea looks interesting but as the illustration shows its going to need a new BD player as well as a TV. Most of us are just getting used to our HDTV and BD player. To get us to change it is going to take some real convincing. I've yet to see any 3D in the theatres that has blown my socks off and I've left two such movies so far with a headache from the glasses. I keep hoping that someone will figure out how to achieve a good 3D effect without glasses. Is this even possible or will this always be more than one prototype away?

Dioneo
2009-09-30, 10:08 AM
The fact that Sony will implement 3D support on the PS3 means that HDMI 1.4 is not required. My next TV purchase should still be a few years away. I'd be interested in having 3D as a feature on whatever my next set will be.