OTA Cabling: RG-6, RG-59, RG-11, P3 Hardline, Twin-Lead, Crimping - Page 3 - Canadian TV, Computing and Home Theatre Forums

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post #31 of 694 (permalink) Old 2008-12-23, 02:02 AM
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For OTA we are only handling frequencies between 54MHz and 806MHz (and its shrinking from that in the future) so unless you are also planning to run satellite gear on the same coax then the "swept to X MHz" doesn't matter.

RG-6 and RG-6/U are the same thing in today's consumer market.

Quad shielding is very rarely worth the extra money. You would need to be located almost right on top of an OTA broadcast antenna farm to require quad.
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post #32 of 694 (permalink) Old 2008-12-23, 08:41 AM
 
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Quad shield at Walmart

Its made by philips and the extra shielding was worth it for me to shield out strong Toronto FM stations from my fm antenna feed and allow co-channel reception of buffalo fm stations.The regular RG6 was allowing the Toronto fm in with just the cable connected no antenna.

Attic CM 4248 at Buffalo,M4 at Buffalo.VHF yagis at Toronto .
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post #33 of 694 (permalink) Old 2008-12-23, 12:45 PM
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I don't quite understand. Unless you've got a super direction FM antenna you're going to get undesired FM signal ingress regardless of cable type.

What extra shielding will help with is reducing signal attenuation which becomes problematic on long coax runs at UHF and above frequencies.
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post #34 of 694 (permalink) Old 2008-12-23, 01:09 PM
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Coaxial cable relies on its internal conductor to handle the signal. In today's consumer grade RG-6 the conductor is solid 1mm copper.

Any signal losses (about 6 dB every 100 feet) occur on that conductor. If I wrap a 100 foot length of RG-6 in additional shielding I will still have the exact same line loss of about 6dB.

The shielding is only just that - shielding.
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post #35 of 694 (permalink) Old 2009-01-21, 11:17 AM
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OTA over LAN cable & adapters?

Reply to post in the Ottawa Reception thread:
Quote:
Originally Posted by TECHNOKID
can anyone tell me if RJ45 through coax converters would be a viable option?
I don't know the comparison of the actual wire from twinlead to Cat5e but TV amps and tuners are sensitive to the wire's velocity and other factors so I cannot say if its a one-for-one swap.

Where something like Cat5e through RJ45s would be problematic is with interference - it would be hard to trace to a single location over a long run. There is such a thing as shielded Cat5e but its expensive and hard to work with, so I'd say just stick with coax and standard F-fittings.
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post #36 of 694 (permalink) Old 2009-03-16, 03:25 PM
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Question RG-59 vs. RG-6?

hi
ive been coming over to this forum to try to set up an OTA antenna but there were some questions i couldnt find an answer to

how much of a signal loss will i suffer if i use RG59 instead of RG6?
are we talking about 2-3 channels lost or is it gonna be more than that?
and should i use an amplifier since my cable is going to be about 80-100 feet?

thanks
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post #37 of 694 (permalink) Old 2009-03-16, 03:47 PM
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DarKYiNe, this table from HDTVPrimer compares the loss rates of RG-59 and RG-6, with the industrial-grade RG-11 too:



Go with RG-6 all the way if you can, especially since you're talking about an 80 to 100 foot length.
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post #38 of 694 (permalink) Old 2009-03-17, 04:37 PM
 
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Lightbulb What is best cable for OTA?

Hello,


What is very good (the best) coax cable for OTA?

Is quad-shield rg-6 good or that is just a gimmick?

What is the difference between 60 % and 90 % Braid coax?

What about RG-11 and Hardline 7/8, can we use it for home OTA?

Is it important to put quality connectors compared to generic Addison connectors?

What are some good stores for purchasing quality stuff in Montreal or online?


Thanks for your time,

Intravino
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post #39 of 694 (permalink) Old 2009-03-18, 07:44 AM
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The best usually isn't practical. I used RG-11 from the roof to the ground block, and RG-6 quad for everything else.
I used Digicon11 connectors and borrowed the ($200) crimp tool from an installer.
For all recent mods, like my sat dish multiswitch, I used Ideal snapnseal type connectors, bought the cutter/stripper/crimper kit from home depot and Phillips Quad RG6 from walmart.
There was a recent post with a chart about the differences in cable.

Samsung TV, Pio-Elite AVR, OppoBD, Wharfedale Speakers, Kicker/Crown Subs, DB-4e OTA:)
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post #40 of 694 (permalink) Old 2009-03-18, 09:28 PM
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Further to above relating to best cable to use:

I always go with a white coloured sheath on my cable. Resistance increases the hotter the cable gets. Therefore, using a light coloured cable improves performance in hot/sunny conditions.
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post #41 of 694 (permalink) Old 2009-03-19, 11:11 AM
 
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RG-11

Can you run RG-11 inside the house until the Tuner or is that too much of a Pita?


And compression connectors are they really better the regular crimp connectors?


I love the numbers on CATV Hardline; 0.5 db loss over 100 feet. I'm sure the connectors are expensive and hard to get. I would love to run that from the CM7777 to the grounding block.


Intravino
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post #42 of 694 (permalink) Old 2009-03-19, 01:24 PM
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You can run RG-11 anywhere, but it is overkill because RG-6 performs almost the same at smaller lengths and RG-6 is much more flexible. Crimping the ends on RG-11 also requires different tools and parts.
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post #43 of 694 (permalink) Old 2009-03-19, 01:59 PM
 
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Stampeder,


What about RG-6UQ Quad-Shield?

Is it really better then Rg-6?

And the difference between 60 % braid and 90 % braid?


Thanks,


Intravino
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post #44 of 694 (permalink) Old 2009-03-19, 02:51 PM
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To me quad-shield is also overkill unless you are stringing your coax through/past areas of high EMF interference, which is very rare in a typical home.

Having said that, other members have pointed out that some stores sell it as their basic RG-6 type so if the price is good I don't see any harm in it. If you are going to crimp it yourself you'll have to be careful with how you handle that extra shielding so that you don't void it or cause a short.

Some RG-6 comes with a "messenger wire" that is stiff wire bonded to the outside of the coax. This type is not as flexible as standard RG-6 but some people use it to have a chassis ground on all their linked OTA gear, including the ATSC tuners/TV sets. It is not suitable for lightning protection or proper grounding, it just establishes a steady 0V to drain off any static electricity buildup.
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post #45 of 694 (permalink) Old 2009-03-20, 03:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stampeder View Post
Some RG-6 comes with a "messenger wire" that is stiff wire bonded to the outside of the coax. This type is not as flexible as standard RG-6 but some people use it to have a chassis ground on all their linked OTA gear, including the ATSC tuners/TV sets. It is not suitable for lightning protection or proper grounding, it just establishes a steady 0V to drain off any static electricity buildup.
Correct me if I am wrong, but isn't that "messenger wire" actually for telephone pole mounting to take the strain off of the conductors when stretched from pole to pole?
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