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post #1 of 10 (permalink) Old 2016-07-27, 10:13 AM Thread Starter
 
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Location: Ottawa;Denon AVR590, Samsung LN32B460, BellTV 6141
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Windows 7 Networking

I am trying to connect 3 computers via a LinksKey LKR-604 Broadband router.


I previously had a Rogers ZTE MF28B wireless router with 4 ethernet ports to connect to the Internet.

I had to replace it with a Rogers ZTE MF275R wireless router with 1 ethernet port.

So I needed 2 more ports.


I can not make my main PC connect to the Internet with it connected to the ZTE. I have Windows 7.



Is it possible to use it as a network switch by only making use of the LAN ports and not using the WAN port?
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post #2 of 10 (permalink) Old 2016-07-27, 11:03 AM
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It's possible but may not be the best way to do it. At the very least, DHCP must be disabled on one of the routers. Any other features that may interfere with the other router must also be disabled. Another issue is that LinksKey LKR-604 router has 10/100mbps LAN ports. Most computers have 10/10/1000mbps ports so the router will slow down the LAN. An unmanaged gigabit switch such as this is a better solution.
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post #3 of 10 (permalink) Old 2016-07-27, 11:39 AM Thread Starter
 
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Thanks ExDilbert.
I have everything connected and working using only the LAN ports and my speed does not seem to be affected (speedtest.net).
I have turned off DHCP on the LinksKey router.

I will definitely look into the GB Switch. It looks excellent.
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post #4 of 10 (permalink) Old 2016-07-27, 08:51 PM
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Quote:
At the very least, DHCP must be disabled on one of the routers.
That's incorrect. Just set the DHCP servers to hand out different parts of the same address pool and provide the same addresses for gateway, DNS, etc..

It is quite common in business to have more than one DHCP server. The DHCP protocol is designed to work with more than one DHCP server and the client will generally go with the first one to respond.

Meanwhile, back at the ranch...
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post #5 of 10 (permalink) Old 2016-07-28, 09:10 AM
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Even so, it's much easier to disable DHCP on the internal router than to deal with configuring them to work together. Letting the internet connected router use its default settings and disabling DHCP on the internal router is the easiest and least trouble prone route for most people. Not using the WAN port on the internal router adds extra issues.
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post #6 of 10 (permalink) Old 2016-12-05, 04:53 AM
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If you are pretty confused by above replies , diable the DHCP server and provide manual Ip address to each client. that will also work
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post #7 of 10 (permalink) Old 2016-12-05, 10:27 AM
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^^^ Also a lot more work and prone to human error. Most devices these days default to obtaining an address using DHCP.
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post #8 of 10 (permalink) Old 2016-12-14, 09:26 AM
 
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There is an easy solution. You can buy two wifi adapter which will receive the wifi signal. Now, every device is going for wifi and keep forgetting about wires. Why should be you any different?
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post #9 of 10 (permalink) Old 2016-12-15, 08:31 AM
 
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Because Wired will ALWAYS be better.

Even under the best case scenarios, with the best wireless broadcaster (which most basic ones by IPS or bought are not), and best wireless receivers (again, most built into things are pretty poor).
You will still sometimes be limited in speeds... as well just straight off the bat, you will usually have less latency.

Start moving away, interference, etc.. things start lessening.

Your will always be more guaranteed to get better performance if wired.

GDKitty
Rogers 9865, LG 47LV5400 LED TV, Onkyo HT-R690.
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post #10 of 10 (permalink) Old 2016-12-25, 01:36 AM
 
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Well, since you are having trouble with wires, I think you better go for the good than for the BETTER. And about the Windows 7, the only complicated and questionable site of Windows 7 is it's networking features. So, it's suppose to give you a little trouble getting connected all three machines.
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