Streaming on your Local area network - Canadian TV, Computing and Home Theatre Forums
 
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post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old 2009-11-25, 05:56 PM Thread Starter
 
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Streaming on your Local area network

Some Internet providers have a usage cap.
If you are streaming video on your local network from one device to another does that count?
which leads to another question. Do you even need an ISP for a local network?
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post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old 2009-11-25, 10:31 PM
rpr
 
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No and no. If it doesn't leave your local network, it doesn't count. If it did, I would be paying a LOT more than I am now. And no you don't need an ISP for a local network, just a switch or wireless router.
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post #3 of 9 (permalink) Old 2009-11-27, 04:28 PM
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And no you don't need an ISP for a local network, just a switch or wireless router.
If you are only connecting two devices, you don't even need that. You can just connect the two with a crossover cable. Some setup would be required as there won't be a DHCP server, unless you put one on one of the PCs.
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post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old 2009-11-30, 12:00 PM
 
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Gigabit switches are the cheapest, easiest and best solution for networking.

My old, old wireless router (with the cable modem connected) connects to one of them so internet can be shared on the whole network.

The other computers talk to each other whether the wireless router is connected or not.

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post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old 2009-12-02, 06:42 PM
rpr
 
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@roger1818: yes, that's true, but crossover network cables aren't exactly common in most computer stores, and most people don't have the knowledge or tools to make them. And yes, it is a bit trickier to setup. As mentioned, the easiest route is to use a router, wireless or not, since they usually have DHCP servers to take care of the network stuff for you.
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post #6 of 9 (permalink) Old 2009-12-03, 05:17 PM
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As mentioned, the easiest route is to use a router, wireless or not, since they usually have DHCP servers to take care of the network stuff for you.
And their also smart enough to negate the need for crossover cables!
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post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old 2009-12-03, 06:58 PM
 
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Macs don't require a special crossover cable, you can use a regular ethernet cable and connect two Macs together. Or alternatively, just set one Mac to share it's connection via Wifi and more than one Mac can connect wirelessly.

No real need for a switch or router, if you have Macs. Handy if you are away from home and have two Macs that you need to connect wired or wireless.

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post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old 2009-12-03, 07:55 PM
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There is no need for crossover cables. Almost all 100Mbps and 1000Mbps Ethernet devices auto-negotiate. They were required for 10Mb/s devices but who has those anymore? (Well, OK, I have an old 10Mbps card in a junk box in the basement.) Even with a 10Mbps device, chances are the port it connects to will auto-negotiate.

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If you are streaming video on your local network from one device to another does that count?
Only if the stream goes to a PC on the internet. If it stays local, it does not count.

Quote:
Do you even need an ISP for a local network?
No. An ISP is only required to access computers on the internet. a Local Area Network (LAN) is just that, between PCs on a single site.

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post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old 2009-12-03, 10:20 PM
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It's obviously been a few years since I tried to directly connect two computers without a switch. I especially miss Arcnet...
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