Toronto Hydro increases electricity prices for winter

toronto_hydroToronto Hydro will be changing to winter pricing on November 1st and will be increasing increasing its Regulated Price Plan (RPP) rates by 0.1 cents per kilowatt hour (kWh).

Customers on Time-of-use (TOU) pricing will also see their rates changed.

The new Ontario Energy Board rates are 5.8 cents per kWh for the first 1000 kWh of electricity consumed each month and 6.7 cents per kWh for any additional usage.

For the 250,000 customers in Toronto on time-of-use (TOU) pricing, the regulated OEB rates are changing to:

  • Off-peak (lowest price) at 4.4 cents/kWh – M-F 9pm to 7am
  • Mid-peak (mid price) at 8.0 cents/kWh – M-F 11am to 5pm
  • On-peak (highest price) at 9.3 cents/kWh – M-F 7am to 11am and 5pm to 9pm

Electricity used on weekends and holidays is priced at the lowest, off-peak price all day.

In addition to the cents per kilowatt hour charges, all Toronto Hydro customers will be required to pay the following:

  • Transmission Charge: 1.05¢/kWh
  • Distribution Charge: 1.352¢/kWh
  • Wholesale Market Operations: 0.65¢/kWh
  • Debt Retirement Charge: 0.7¢/kWh

Add it all up and under the Regulated Price Plan, this winter Toronto Hydro customers will pay 9.552 cents per kWh up to 1000 kWh of electricity consumed each month; and 10.452 cents per kWh for any additional usage above the 1000 kWh threshold.

In addition, Toronto Hydro customers pay a customer charge of $17.50 per 30 days and an admin charge of 0.25¢ per 30 days.

Comments

One Response to “Toronto Hydro increases electricity prices for winter”
  1. tomk says:

    this article points out that our electricity prices are still lower than other places in the world, but as our demand grows beyond our generating capacity, we’ll be buying more expensive power from other sources, mostly outside ontario.

    dalton mcguinty had better get busy ordering new power stations, or we’ll start to look like a third-world country, with regular power outages.

    instead of dabbling in “green” energy, like his latest initiative that pays 80 cents a kilowatt hour (20 times what we pay now!) for solar energy, he needs to get off his thumbs and start doing something useful, whether it’s natural gas-fired, or nuclear.

    and he still hasn’t shut down nanticoke.